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friends,I am getting a date based on the calculation I have done below

      NSCalendar *gregorian          = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];

        NSDate *expectedDate           = [gregorian dateByAddingComponents:components toDate:startDate options:0];
        NSTimeInterval timeZoneOffset  = -[[NSTimeZone systemTimeZone] secondsFromGMTForDate:expectedDate];
        NSDate *localDate              = [expectedDate dateByAddingTimeInterval:(timeZoneOffset)];

         NSString *date  = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:localDate];

But the date goes wrong when the daylightsaving is in effect,and also the timeZoneOffset changes when the daylightsaving is in effect, but I want the same date irrespective of whether the daylight saving is in effect or no..

So friends,how shall I handle this situation,please help.

Regards Ranjit

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I too am having the same problem. Can't seem to find an easy solution to fix this. –  James Hickman Sep 14 '12 at 18:39
    
Did you figured it out? –  Ranjit Sep 17 '12 at 6:30

2 Answers 2

You don't need to take care of daylight saving time yourself, the "dateFormatter" does that automatically for you. Usually you only need a NSDate object in UTC (GMT+0) time and "dateFormatter", which also has a time zone, will display that time in its own time zone.

NSCalendar and NSDateFormatter have time zone settings. NSDate is just a point in time relative to GMT+0.

Example: "expectedDate" is January 1st 4am (GMT+0) "dateFormatter" has time zone GMT+2 (e.g. Europe/Berlin) set, then it will output "January 1st 6am" because of its own time zone when converting "expectedDate" into a string.

So basically you just need to ensure that "startDate" is correct and that "gregorian" and "dateFormatter" use the correct time zone. By default they use the system time zone, which seems to be the one you want to use. So you need only these lines (and startDate has to be correct):

    NSCalendar *gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];
    NSDate *expectedDate = [gregorian dateByAddingComponents:components toDate:startDate options:0];
    NSString *date  = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:expectedDate];

If that doesn't work, please post more code about how startDate and dateFormatter are generated.

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+1 Absolutely correct. Compensating for the time zone is unnecessary. –  Dave DeLong Nov 16 '12 at 23:00

James, try this

//To Fix DaylightSaving, 1 hr added to startDate.

        NSTimeInterval secondsInOneHour = 1 * 60 * 60;
        NSDate *expectedDST       = [startDate dateByAddingTimeInterval:secondsInOneHour];        
        NSDate *expectedDate      = [gregorian dateByAddingComponents:components toDate:expectedDST options:0];

        NSTimeInterval timeZoneOffset  = -[[NSTimeZone systemTimeZone] secondsFromGMTForDate:expectedDate];

        NSDate *localDate              = [expectedDate dateByAddingTimeInterval:timeZoneOffset]; 
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