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Now I have a python project, I write my unit-testing code in many of its folders, the tree looks like:

Project
├── module1
│   ├── submodule1
│   │   ├── base.py
│   │   ├── model.py
│   │   └── tests.py
│   ├── conn.py
│   ├── __init__.py
│   └── tests.py
├── errors.py
├── __init__.py
├── router.py
└── tests.py

You can see there are many tests.py files in the projects, at root folder in modules. I use nose to help me do testing, When I want to test all of them, just run nosetests Project at upper folder, everything works fine.

Then comes to my question: I have seen some projects like tornado, they put all test files in one folder so that it is clear to manage them (I guess), is that a better way than what I do currently, if yes, then why ? And according to the philosophy of Python, is there anything wrong in my way of doing test ?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by duffymo, Martijn Pieters, Zero Piraeus, Bibhas, EdChum Mar 5 at 8:35

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Personnally, I prefer to store my test files into a specific subdirectory test, yet I like to keep test and code very near, so I have test subdirectories every where in my project.

 Project
    ├── module1
    │   ├── submodule1
    │   │   ├── base.py
    │   │   ├── model.py
    │   │   └── test
    │   │       └── submodule1_test.py
    │   ├── conn.py
    │   ├── __init__.py
    │   └── test
    │       └── module1_test.py
    ├── errors.py
    ├── __init__.py
    ├── router.py
    └── test
        └── errors_test.py
        └── router_test.py

Very easy to make a packaging with avoiding all tests directories.

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Thanks for sharing your experience, could you tell me how to avoid test directories if find_packages is used in setup script ? –  Reorx Mar 22 '12 at 11:58
    
@Reorx : as described here find_packages(exclude=["*.test", "*.test.*", "test.*", "test"]) should works –  Cédric Julien Mar 22 '12 at 13:28
    
Thanks, got it ~ –  Reorx Mar 23 '12 at 1:36
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I put tests under a /test folder, separate from the source. It makes packaging easier for those cases where I don't want to ship the test code.

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If I put tests in each subdirectories, its also possible to ignore them when packaging, is there any other advantages of putting them together ? –  Reorx Mar 22 '12 at 12:02
1  
Then it's just taste. I prefer to keep the source and test code completely separate. It sounds subjective. –  duffymo Mar 22 '12 at 12:09
    
Yeah I will try your suggestion, thanks very much ~ –  Reorx Mar 23 '12 at 1:37
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