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I'm consecutively reading blocks of BLOCKSIZE (e.g. 512) bytes from a SocketChannel into a ByteBuffer. I'd then like to append the ByteBuffer content to a byte[] and go for the next round. The result would be a byte[] containing all the bytes that were read from the SocketChannel.

Now, System.arraycopy(...) works as expected. But when I use ByteBuffer's get(result, offset, length), nothing is written. The result array values remain zeroed.

Why is that?

  public final static int BLOCKSIZE = 512;

  public byte[] getReceivedData() {
    int offset = 0, read;
    byte[] result = {};
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(BLOCKSIZE);
    try {
      while (true) {
        read = _socketChannel.read(buffer);
        if (read < 1) {
          // Nothing was read.
          break;
        }

        // Enlarge result so we can append the bytes we just read.
        result = Arrays.copyOf(result, result.length + read);

        // This works as expected.
        System.arraycopy(buffer.array(), 0, result, offset * BLOCKSIZE, read);

        // With this, however, nothing is written to result. Why?
        buffer.get(result, offset * BLOCKSIZE, read);

        if (read < BLOCKSIZE) {
          // Nothing left to read from _socketChannel.
          break;
        }

        buffer.clear();
      }
    } catch (IOException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return result;
  }

EDIT:

I noticed offset++ was missing, too. So if there is more than BLOCKSIZE bytes on the channel, things get messed up...

Anyways, ByteArrayOutputStream really makes things simpler there so I decided to use that.

Working code:

  public byte[] getReceivedData() {
    int read;
    ByteArrayOutputStream result = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(BLOCKSIZE);
    try {
      while (true) {
        buffer.clear();
        read = _socketChannel.read(buffer);
        if (read < 1) {
          break;
        }
        result.write(buffer.array(), 0, read);
        if (read < BLOCKSIZE) {
          break;
        }
      }
    } catch (IOException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return result.toByteArray();
  }
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to flip() the buffer before the get(), and compact() it afterwards.

If read == -1 you need to not only break out of the loop but close the channel too.

share|improve this answer
    
flip() did the trick, thanks. I think compact() is not required though. After get()ing everything from the buffer, nothing is left to compact and it's clear()ed on each iteration anyways. Also, thanks for the hint on closing the channel. I'm aware that channels are kept open and that's intended. Clients may send new data anytime. – riha Mar 22 '12 at 12:51
    
@riha Wrong. No client is ever going to send you any more data after you get the -1. That is end of stream on the channel, and it means the peer has closed the connection, or at least shut it down for output. Close it. – EJP Mar 22 '12 at 21:15
    
Hm ok, then it really should be closed on my side too. Though that's never ever supposed to happen in my case, but that's another story. Thanks again. – riha Mar 23 '12 at 9:59

Your result array is of length 0 and cannot hold any information. Byte arrays do not grow, and you are unable to append buffers' content. Use java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream to accumulate result.

share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. His result array is reassigned inside the loop. – EJP Mar 22 '12 at 11:08
    
Nice hint on ByteArrayOutputStream. That makes things waaay simpler. – riha Mar 22 '12 at 14:38

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