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I have a legacy interface that gives me the type to instance under the form of a string, for example "int", "float", etc.

I've came up with these two functions to solve the problem:

template <typename T>
T type_factory(const std::string& type_id)
{
    if (!type_id.compare("long"))
    {
        long res;
        return res;
    }

    if (!type_id.compare("double"))
    {
        double res;
        return res;
    }

    if (!type_id.compare("char"))
    {
        char res;
        return res;
    }
}

and

template <class PointerClass, typename T>
PointerClass<T>* pointer_factory(void* ptr, T dummy_type)
{
    return static_cast<PointerClass<T>*>(ptr);
}

//Desidered usage:
//void* raw_ptr;
//Calculator<int>* p = pointer_factory<Calculator>(raw_ptr, type_factory("int"));

The second function doesn't compile the error is "expected unqualified-id" near PointerClass.

Could someone please tell me why the second function does not compile and how to fix it?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
The first function is not correct. There is no type T that is a supertype of long, double and char. –  Luca Martini Mar 22 '12 at 10:15
    
First of all, don’t use compare. Use == instead! –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 22 '12 at 10:15
    
@LucaMartini: You're right. It was a quick hack to poke around with the subject, but if I have to specify the type it's pretty useless though. –  Alfredo Di Napoli Mar 22 '12 at 10:26
    
@KonradRudolph: Could you please tell my why? –  Alfredo Di Napoli Mar 22 '12 at 10:26
1  
@KonradRudolph compare does not create a temporary std::string, so I believe in this case it can be better to avoid operator== –  Luca Martini Mar 22 '12 at 10:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems like you need a template template:

template < template<typename T> class PointerClass, typename T>
PointerClass<T>* pointer_factory(void* ptr, T dummy_type) 

instead of

template <class PointerClass, typename T>
PointerClass<T>* pointer_factory(void* ptr, T dummy_type)

since PointerClass is itself a template.

This fixes the compilation error, you'll have to test if it does what you want yourself, though I doubt it will.

EDIT:

Seems like a factory class, instead of templates, might be easier to write and understand by others in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks everyone, I have not finished here but I'm a bit closer to what I want to accomplish :) –  Alfredo Di Napoli Mar 22 '12 at 10:34

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