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I have such a program:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>

static int pswd=0;

int main() {

    do {
        std::cout<<"I need your password:"<<std::endl;          
        std::cin>>pswd;
    } while (pswd!=3855);

    std::cout<<"Congratulations! Your password is correct! Your soul is free again!"<<std::endl;
}

And I have, may be, a stupid question. When I enter invalid values (with non-numerical symbols or values greater then int) program goes in endless loop without reading of any information from console.

I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
I need your password:
        ...

Why does this program go in endless loop?

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because after invalid input, the stream is in failed state and all further input operations are no-op. You always have to check the result of the input operation.

do {
    std::cout<<"I need your password:"<<std::endl;          
    if (!(std::cin >> pswd)) {
        // clear error flags
        std::cin.clear();
        // discard erroneous input (include <limits>)
        std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    }
} while (pswd!=3855);
share|improve this answer
1  
This will treat non-numerical input as a correct password. – interjay Mar 22 '12 at 11:33
    
Perhaps it would be better to absorb the failed input instead of a break – Ed Heal Mar 22 '12 at 11:34
    
I didn't really pay attention to the semantics of the loop. It's mostly about illustrating the error handling. – Cat Plus Plus Mar 22 '12 at 11:35
2  
But this is not the correct way to handle errors - you need to show how to recover from the failed input. – interjay Mar 22 '12 at 11:36
    
Fiiiine, I found the snippet. – Cat Plus Plus Mar 22 '12 at 11:44

It is trying to read an int but it can take a peek into the buffer from STDIN. It notices that you have not got an int so the cin>> fails. (See fail bit).

So it just goes around again. You need to check for failed type conversion.

share|improve this answer

I'm pretty sure you want to be reading in a string here, as there's nothing to control what the user is typing.

You want to read into a char buffer (the one below supports 256 characters) and then compare it with the password you're looking for using strcmp:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream.h>

static int pswd=0;
static char buffer[256];

int main()
{
    do
    {
        std::cout<<"I need your password:"<<std::endl;          
        std::cin>>buffer;
    }
    while (strcmp("3855", buffer));
    std::cout<<"Congratulations! Your password is correct! Your soul is free again!"<<std::endl;
}

Note that strcmp returns 0 when two strings match.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. It's a good idea. But I want to understand this phenomena solely in educational purposes. – Lucky Man Mar 22 '12 at 11:42
1  
This is a potential buffer overflow, use std::string instead. Also, the header to include is <iostream>. – interjay Mar 22 '12 at 11:44
    
That's true enough, hence I pointed out that it only reads 256 characters! But yes, it should use std::string – LaceySnr Mar 22 '12 at 12:23

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