Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to use interception with Unity, here is my code :

UnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
container.AddNewExtension<Interception>();
container.RegisterType<T, T>();
container.Configure<Interception>().SetDefaultInterceptorFor<T>(new VirtualMethodInterceptor());
return container.Resolve<T>();

If T is a class with a constructor with parameters (an an empty constructor) an exception is thrown when I call Resolve, else it works. How can I intercept a type who has a non empty constructor ?

Update

UnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
container.AddNewExtension<Interception>();
container.RegisterType<T, T>();
container.Configure<InjectedMembers>().ConfigureInjectionFor<T>(new InjectionConstructor());
container.Configure<Interception>().SetDefaultInterceptorFor<T>(new VirtualMethodInterceptor());
return container.Resolve<T>();

This code works, but what if I'd like to use a constructor with argument ?

I've tried this :

public static T Resolve<T>(object param)
{
    UnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
    container.AddNewExtension<Interception>();
    container.RegisterType<T, T>();
    container.Configure<InjectedMembers>().ConfigureInjectionFor<T>(new InjectionConstructor(param));
    container.Configure<Interception>().SetDefaultInterceptorFor<T>(new VirtualMethodInterceptor());
    return container.Resolve<T>();
}

And in my code :

var service = Resolve<MyService>(4);

And I'm back with the same exception as earlier...

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Use the InjectionConstructor attribute as described here.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to inject anything, I just want to create the interceptor which will call the empty constructor of T. –  Nicolas Dorier Jun 11 '09 at 17:21

Unity will pick the constructor with the most arguments, so you have a few options:

1) Use configuration to specify using the no arg constructor like so:

Container.Configure<InjectedMembers>()
    .ConfigureInjectionFor<MyService>(new InjectionConstructor());

2) Annotate your object

public class MyService
{
    [InjectionConstructor]
    public MyService()
    {
    }

    public MyService(int arg1)
    {     
    }
}

3) override the DefaultUnityConstructorSelectorPolicy with your own that chooses the no arg constructor if it exists.

share|improve this answer
    
It works, but if I want to use MyService(int arg1), it throws (see my question, I've updated) –  Nicolas Dorier Jun 18 '09 at 8:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's a bug

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.