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I have an interface like this:

interface IAuthentication
{
    void AuthenticateAsync(string user, string pwhash);
    event EventHandler<AuthenticationResult> AuthenticationDone;
}

This works by raising the event when it is done. Now, I would like to wrap this mechanism inside a single, blocking method that returns the authentication result after it is done:

AuthenticationResult Authenticate(string user, string pwhash)
{
    var auth = GetIAuthenticator();
    // ... do something
    return <the authentication result from the even argument>;
}

Is this possible somehow?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using .Net 4.0? If yes, then the task parallel library will help you. –  ken2k Mar 22 '12 at 13:34
    
Yes, I'm using .NET 4.0. –  Tamás Szelei Mar 22 '12 at 13:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With wait handle you don't need to check some flags, block thread and set timeouts:

private AuthenticationResult Authenticate(string user, string pwhash)
{            
    IAuthentication auth = GetIAuthenticator();
    AuthenticationResult result = null;
    AutoResetEvent waitHangle = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    auth.AuthenticationDone += (o, e) =>
        {
            result = e;
            waitHangle.Set();
        };

    auth.AuthenticateAsync(user, pwhash);
    waitHangle.WaitOne(); // or waitHangle.WaitOne(interval);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
How long this would wait in case of broken network connection/etc? –  sll Mar 22 '12 at 14:55
    
You can use overloaded WaitOne method, with max interval for waiting. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 22 '12 at 14:58
1  
I think it needs the interval to block at all. Nevertheless, it is indeed a very elegant solution. –  Tamás Szelei Mar 22 '12 at 15:00
    
Right, nice one, +1 –  sll Mar 22 '12 at 15:01
    
BTW if you want to completely hide asyn mechanism, change return type of method from EvenArgs to some actual data :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 22 '12 at 15:11

As you're using .Net 4.0, you could take advantage of the Task Parallel Library.

Here's a very basic program that shows how to use TaskCompletionSource:

public class Test
{
    public void Go()
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((z) => this.Imp());
    }

    private void Imp()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Asynchronous operation in progress (1/2)...");
        Thread.Sleep(2000);
        Console.WriteLine("Asynchronous operation in progress (2/2)...");

        if (this.Done != null)
        {
            this.Done(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    public event EventHandler Done;
}

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test test = new Test();

        TaskCompletionSource<object> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>(null);

        Console.WriteLine("Starting asynchronous operation");

        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            test.Done += (sender, e) => tcs.SetResult(null);
            test.Go();
        });

        // Blocking until completion of the async operation
        var tmp = tcs.Task.Result;

        Console.WriteLine("Asynchronous operation completed");

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Result is:

Starting asynchronous operation
Asynchronous operation in progress (1/2)...
Asynchronous operation in progress (2/2)...
Asynchronous operation completed

As you can see, the execution flow is blocked until the asynchronous operation terminates.

share|improve this answer
    
Why you need separate thread in case of synchronous request? –  sll Mar 22 '12 at 14:04
    
@sll There is no thread created but a task started, which is not the same. TPL is used is the example to take advantage of the TaskCompletionSource class. –  ken2k Mar 22 '12 at 14:10
    
AFAIK TPL could or could not create a thread (in pool) for async operation, I believe you've no control over this, am I wrong? BTW, Your sample output saying other - "main thread.. another thread", what does it mean then? –  sll Mar 22 '12 at 14:13
    
@sll It's probably not well explained in the example, but the a new thread is created (actually ThreadPool is used) to simulate the asynchronous operation (see Test class). It has nothing to do with the TPL itself. I'll rename those texts to make it more clear. –  ken2k Mar 22 '12 at 14:18
    
What is the advantage of this solution compared to actively waiting? –  Tamás Szelei Mar 22 '12 at 14:22
private AuthenticationResult Authenticate(string user, string pwhash)
{
    bool isDone = false;
    AuthenticationResult results = null
    var auth = GetIAuthenticator(); 
    auth.AuthenticationDone += (o, e) => 
    {
        isDone = true;
        results = e;
    };

    auth.AuthenticateAsync(user, pwhash);

    long maxWaitTimeSeconds = 10;
    long thresholdMilliseconds = 100;
    int countToWait = maxWaitTimeSeconds * 1000 / thresholdMilliseconds;
    while (!isDone || countToWait-- > 0)
    {
       Thread.Sleep(thresholdMilliseconds);
    }

    if (countToWait == 0 && !isDone)
    {
       // TODO: timeout handling
    }

    return results;    
}

PS: If event args never can be null - you can get rid of isDone variable and just use result != null as "authentication done" indicator

share|improve this answer
    
does the lambda take the isDone variable by reference? –  Tamás Szelei Mar 22 '12 at 13:44
    
If you have another thread and use a wait/notify method you'll have better responsiveness and lower wasteful polling/spinning. –  Servy Mar 22 '12 at 13:45
    
@TamásSzelei It doesn't really pass it at all; it's just accessing the same variable everywhere you see it used here. –  Servy Mar 22 '12 at 13:46
    
1  
@TamásSzelei He meant to re-use maxWaitTimeSeconds in the following declaration of countToWait, instead he just re-used the magic number '10'. –  Servy Mar 22 '12 at 14:37

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