Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using java, mysql, hibernate (3.6.x). On the java side I'm using java.sql.Timestamp objects. On the mysql side I'm using datetime columns.

I want hibernate to save/load these Timestamp objects using UTC time zone regardless of system/java/mysql time zone.

I found " JPA/Hibernate store date in UTC time zone " which was informative but lacking some final implementation info which I'm struggling to find.

I want to implement a UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor as shown in that thread and configure hibernate to use this instead of the normal TimestampTypeDescriptor.

How can I configure hibernate to use the UtcTimestamp type instead of the default Timestamp type?

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you try implementing community.jboss.org/wiki/UserTypeForNon-defaultTimeZone and then come up with the specific questions. –  ManuPK Mar 22 '12 at 14:04
    
I don't want to implement a simple usertype and annotate every date/tiemstamp property. Instead I want to implement a Descriptor and register it in hibernate instead of the default timstamp descriptor. The specific question is where do I register this type with hibernate so it replaces the default one? –  samz Mar 22 '12 at 16:42
    
    
I tried implementing the above link and it traces back to circa 2007 under early versions of Hibernate 3, the APIs of which have completely changed under JPA 2 and Hibnerate 4.x. There are numerous problems with the implementation that make it wholly incompatible. –  Darrell Teague Feb 23 '13 at 19:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I just added an answer on the question you reference that pretty clearly describes how to implement the solution.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/16955113/193435

If anything's not clear please let me know.

share|improve this answer

get class public class UtcTimestampType extends TimestampType from your link
and make this code

@org.hibernate.annotations.Type(type = "yourPackage.UtcTimestampType")   
public java.util.Date date;    

using annotations

or

<property name="date" column="yourColumn" type="yourPackage.UtcTimestampType" />  

using *.hbm.xml

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't want to annotate every date/timestamp property I have. I want hibernate to always use the UTCTimestampType instead of the default type. –  samz Mar 22 '12 at 16:41
    
It is impossible. UTCTimestampType is custom user type. If you want, you can unpack Hibernate's library and hack it. –  Ilya Mar 22 '12 at 16:55
    
Look under that example, at the hibernate 3.6 example. There's an example of a descriptor, not a type. Then it says that when the app starts you can register this type instead of the default one but it doesn't say how/where.. That's basically my question. –  samz Mar 22 '12 at 16:59
    
You can do this, using class Configuration cfg = new Configuration().configure("your.cfg.xml"); cfg.registerTypeOverride(new UtcTimestampType()); –  Ilya Mar 22 '12 at 18:17
    
I followed your trick using annotation but hibernate seems to ignore UtcTimestampType, Why? (even debugger breakpoints not hit) I have Hibernate 3.6.10 –  fl4l Jun 4 at 7:58

An alternative to implementing custom Hibernate types is to add the following JDBC options to your JDBC connection URL:

useTimezone=true
serverTimezone=UTC

This will force your JDBC connection into the UTC timezone and ask MySQL to perform conversions from the JVM timezone. The net effect is that you can keep a local timezone on your JVM (e.g. for printing out log messages and so forth), while DATETIME columns will be persisted as UTC.

For example:

<bean id="hibernateAnalysisSessionFactory" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate4.LocalSessionFactoryBean">
    <property name="hibernateProperties">
        <props>
            <!-- Connection parameters -->
            <prop key="hibernate.connection.driver_class">com.mysql.jdbc.Driver</prop>
            <prop key="hibernate.connection.url">jdbc:mysql://hostname/databaseName?useTimezone=true&amp;serverTimezone=UTC</prop>
            ...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.