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I have added options in application.rb:

config.autoload_paths += %W(#{config.root}/lib)
config.autoload_paths += Dir["#{config.root}/lib/**/"]

and lib\functions.rb:

def some_lib
   return "#######################################"
end

In controller I'm trying to call this function, but get the error:

undefined local variable or method `some_lib' for #<TodosController:0x49a3850>

How can I fix it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order to have rails autoload from the lib dir, you need to follow rails naming conventions.

lib/functions.rb

class Functions
  def self.some_lib
     return "#######################################"
  end
end

Then you can Functions.some_lib

Or

lib/functions.rb

module Functions
  def some_lib
    return "#######################################"
  end
end

Then include Functions where you need your methods. This allows you to execute:

some_lib

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Yeah, basically, don't do that, ruby is an OO language, you're trying to make a procedural language.

There's some way to make it do exactly what you ask involving mixing new methods into Kernel or Object... but that's really not what you want to do.

Do you want to add that new method to all controllers, and not neccesarily to other places? Then just add it to your ApplicationController (./app/controllers/application_controller.rb). Or add it to a module in ./lib, and then "include MyControllerFunctions" into ApplicationController.

Do you really want to be able to use it anywhere at all? Then I'd do what Kyle suggests, make it a module method, and call it as MyFunctions.some_method.

Ruby will let you do just about anything, you could manage to make it callable the way you want from any class at all... but really, you don't want to, it's just gonna lead to a mess.

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