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I have a table like

Table1:

col1
col2
col3

and have an index over col3. If I select the data from the table with the following query.

SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE LCASE(col3) ='abcde'

Does the index help over the performance?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Short answer: No.

Long answer: No.

Imagine the following contents in your col3:

Foo
bar
baz
foo
BAR

The index on col3 would know this order:

BAR
Foo
bar
baz
foo

However, the order of the query lcase(col3) would be

bar
BAR
baz
foo
Foo

completely different from the index, so the index is of limited use.

However, you could add an automatically created field with the lower case to your table:

ALTER TABLE Table1
      ADD COLUMN col3_lcase VARCHAR(?) 
          GENERATED ALWAYS AS ( LCASE(col3) );
CREATE INDEX col3_lcase_idx ON Table1 ( col3_lcase );

the select above would then use the col3_lcase_idx index.

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3  
That's not completely true. It turns from an Index Seek to an Index Scan; what you described is a Table Scan. This is relevant where col3 is not unique. Instead of scanning all rows, it can scan all index entries, each of which may cover multiple rows. So it's still a Scan, and that's sucky, but there can be a partial benefit to having the index. (Still it's better to avoid having to do this if possible. Such as having a persisted calculated field called lower_col3) –  MatBailie Mar 22 '12 at 14:29
    
@beny23 But it must be a way to search case insensitive. I thought that DB2 provide it automatically –  Kayser Mar 22 '12 at 14:29
1  
@Kayser - Create a record with the value ABC and search for it using = 'abc' and see what the results are. I don't know what the DB2 equivilent is, but you can have collation sequences that are case-sensitive or case-insensitive. But if you wrap a field in a function, you deeply damage the ability to use the indexes. –  MatBailie Mar 22 '12 at 14:31
    
@Dems thanks for the clarification. –  beny23 Mar 22 '12 at 14:35
    
Thanks.... @DEMS –  Kayser Mar 22 '12 at 14:48

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