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I would like to perform a test if an object is of a generic type. I've tried the following without success:

public bool Test()
{
    List<int> list = new List<int>();
    return list.GetType() == typeof(List<>);
}

What am I doing wrong and how do I perform this test?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 71 down vote accepted

If you want to check if it's an instance of a generic type:

return list.GetType().IsGenericType;

If you want to check if it's a generic List<T>:

return list.GetType().GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(List<>);

As Jon points out, this checks the exact type equivalence. Returning false doesn't necessarily mean list is List<T> returns false (i.e. the object cannot be assigned to a List<T> variable).

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That won't detect subtypes though. See my answer. It's also much harder for interfaces :( –  Jon Skeet Jun 11 '09 at 17:38
    
Thanks, so simple, but useful. –  Richbits Jun 11 '09 at 17:40
    
Thanks Jon, I had done a search, but will try and search your answer out. This is fine though, as I don't need to detect subtypes. –  Richbits Jun 11 '09 at 17:41

I assume that you don't just want to know if the type is generic, but if an object is an instance of a particular generic type, without knowing the type arguments.

It's not terribly simple, unfortunately. It's not too bad if the generic type is a class (as it is in this case) but it's harder for interfaces. Here's the code for a class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;

class Test
{
    static bool IsInstanceOfGenericType(Type genericType, object instance)
    {
        Type type = instance.GetType();
        while (type != null)
        {
            if (type.IsGenericType &&
                type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericType)
            {
                return true;
            }
            type = type.BaseType;
        }
        return false;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // True
        Console.WriteLine(IsInstanceOfGenericType(typeof(List<>),
                                                  new List<string>()));
        // False
        Console.WriteLine(IsInstanceOfGenericType(typeof(List<>),
                                                  new string[0]));
        // True
        Console.WriteLine(IsInstanceOfGenericType(typeof(List<>),
                                                  new SubList()));
        // True
        Console.WriteLine(IsInstanceOfGenericType(typeof(List<>),
                                                  new SubList<int>()));
    }

    class SubList : List<string>
    {
    }

    class SubList<T> : List<T>
    {
    }
}
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Just discovered a problem with this. It only goes down a single line of inheritance. If, along the way, you have a base with both a base class and the interface you're looking for, this goes down the class path only. –  Groxx Mar 18 '11 at 23:41
    
@Groxx: True. I've just spotted that I do mention that in the answer though: "It's not too bad if the generic type is a class (as it is in this case) but it's harder for interfaces. Here's the code for a class" –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '11 at 7:31
    
Ah, you're right. I missed the "for a class" part. Thanks for the chunk of code, btw, it has been handy :) –  Groxx Mar 19 '11 at 22:12
    
What if you don't have a way to know <T>? Like, it might be int, or string, but you don't know that. This generates, it would seem, false negatives... so you don't have a T to use, you're just looking through properties of some object and one is a list. How do you know it is a list so you can unpeel it? By this I mean, you don't have a T anywhere nor a type to use. You could guess every type (is it List<int>? is it List<string>?) but what you want to know is IS THIS A A LIST? That question seems hard to answer. –  RiverC May 9 '13 at 20:09
    
@RiverC: Yes, you're right - it is fairly hard to answer, for various reasons. If you're only talking about a class, it's not too bad... you can keep walking up the inheritance tree and see whether you hit List<T> in some form or other. If you include interfaces, it's really tricky. –  Jon Skeet May 9 '13 at 20:14
return list.GetType().IsGenericType;
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2  
"Is of a" not "Is a" –  Gregory Sep 30 '10 at 1:41
    
the code is still correct, so I don't see the point of your downvote. –  Stan R. Sep 30 '10 at 15:13
3  
It's correct for a different question. For this question, it's incorrect, as it only addresses (significantly less than) half of the problem. –  Groxx Mar 18 '11 at 20:27
    
Stan R's answer does in fact answer the question as posed, but what the OP really meant was "Testing if object is of a particular generic type in C#", for which this answer is indeed incomplete. –  yoyo Mar 14 '13 at 21:43
    
people are down-voting me because i answered the question in the context of "is a" generic type rather than "is of a" generic type. English is my 2nd languages and such language nuances pass me by often, to my defense the OP did not specifically ask to test against a specific type and in the title asks "is of" generic type...not sure why I deserve downvotes for an ambiguous question. –  Stan R. Jun 28 '13 at 16:16

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