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I can't figure out the proper block initialize

class Foo 
  attr_accessor :bar
end

obj = Foo.new do |a|
  a.bar = "baz"
end

puts obj.bar

Expect "baz" instead get nil

What is the proper incantation for block class initializers in ruby?

share|improve this question
    
The attr_accessor can't work in that form and the block is never called. –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:13
    
Thanks, you are right about that, I fixed it so it is "functional" code now –  Doug Mar 22 '12 at 16:24
    
Right, I get that it doesn't get called (which explains why it doesn't work). I like the "tap" idea below, as it lets me use tools like FactoryGirl (which require default initializers) without having to override new. –  Doug Mar 22 '12 at 16:28
    
I don't get it. Can you give an example usage of FactoryGirl where this would be of advantage? –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:34
    
Here's some links on the problem wrong # of args github discussion –  Doug Mar 22 '12 at 16:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try again:

class Foo 
  attr_accessor :bar
end

obj = Foo.new.tap do |a|
  a.bar = "baz"
end

puts obj.bar
share|improve this answer
    
That's not the same. Also, it should raise a NameError. –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:22
    
It's the best way without adding new ways your users have to read the documentation for. –  Reactormonk Mar 22 '12 at 16:28
    
That I agree to. –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:29
1  
This way is better than putting yield self if block_given? in the Foo's initialize method, because often you can't or don't want to modify the Foo class (think of the Open Closed Principle). Plus, why clutter up the initialize method of the Foo class, when a simple method chaining of tap would do? –  Zack Xu Apr 2 at 13:14

Another way to make a block initializer would be writing it yourself one:

class Foo
  attr_accessor :bar

  def initialize
    yield self if block_given?
  end
end

And later use it:

foo = Foo.new do |f|
  f.bar = true
end

My two cents.

share|improve this answer
    
no doubt this is the better way of initializing a class with a block. –  Rodrigo Dias Feb 1 '13 at 12:55

I don't think new can take a block. Never saw it anywhere anyway. Why do you want to initialize in a block ? You can always do obj = foo.new.tap do |a| ... If you really want a block

share|improve this answer
    
It's not that it can't take a block, it's just ugly. Despite this, it's a commonly seen "idiom". –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:14
    
Oh, ok. Well I've learned something today –  ksol Mar 22 '12 at 16:18
    
Why is it ugly? It's a common idiom in other languages that I've used such as c#. –  Doug Mar 22 '12 at 16:21
    
@Doug: It's equally ugly in other languages, the main reason for it being that it doesn't serve any particular purpose and just increases complexity. –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:23
    
It seems clearer and less error-prone to me. There's no order dependency as in a normal constructor, and you get named parameters which are easier to read and write. I'd probably only resort to a constructor if there was some initialization beyond copying in values (which is not always the case) –  Doug Mar 22 '12 at 16:35

actually you have a constructor for these purposes:

class Foo
  attr_accessor :bar

  def initialize(bar = "baz")
    @bar = bar
  end

end
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe you should actually make that a parameter. –  Niklas B. Mar 22 '12 at 16:17
    
Niklas, yeah, that would be better –  Sergey Mar 22 '12 at 16:19

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