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In the same vein as http://stackoverflow.com/questions/257844/quickly-create-a-large-file-on-a-linux-system I'd like to quickly create a large file on a windows system. By large I'm thinking 5GB. The content doesn't matter. A built in command or short batch file would be preferable, but I'll accept an application if there are no other easy ways.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 186 down vote accepted
fsutil file createnew <filename> <length>

where <length> is in bytes.

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37  
Beware that this only generates so called sparse file - you get a record in a folder with a file size but not actual data clusters assigned with the file. So for purposes like testing, zeroing or blocking off large blocks of data clusters it's useless. –  ZXX Dec 21 '10 at 20:08
5  
@ZXX +1 For my purposes I merely needed the file system to see the space as unavailable, but your information is helpful if someone else needs this. –  Leigh Riffel Dec 22 '10 at 13:50
5  
fsutil file createnew does not create a sparse file. –  Per Mildner Jun 30 '13 at 17:58
2  
It also works perfectly for upload tests. –  Nicolas Raoul Sep 17 '13 at 8:35
    
"fsutil sparse setflag temp.txt" sets the sparse flag, making it a sparse file. "fsutil sparse setrange temp.txt 0 1024" sets the range of sparseness :) –  Coldblackice May 10 at 21:53

You can use the Sysinternals Contig tool. It has a -n switch which creates a new file of a given size. It will create a file almost instantaneous.

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Wow! Very fast to download and to run. The line I used is m:\contig -n M:\SpaceBuffer.tmp 5368709120 –  Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 19:52
4  
Just want to check if this is a sparse file or does the file actually have data in it? –  slolife Jun 2 '11 at 17:35
1  
It's not a sparse file (as far as I know) and the file is empty. –  Joey Jan 4 '12 at 10:39

I was searching for a way to generate large files with data..not just sparse file..came across the below technique.

http://www.windows-commandline.com/2009/07/how-to-create-large-dummy-file.html

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The link points to fsutil file createnew filename length –  Thomas Ahle Apr 16 at 10:59
1  
Extract from the link above: If you want to create a file with real data then you can use the below command line script. echo "This is just a sample line appended to create a big file.. " > dummy.txt for /L %i in (1,1,14) do type dummy.txt >> dummy.txt (Run the above two commands one after another or you can add them to a batch file.) The above commands create a 1 MB file dummy.txt within few seconds. –  Tony Stark Aug 26 at 9:08

Check the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools. There is a utility called Creatfil.

 CREATFIL.EXE
 -? : This message
 -FileName -- name of the new file
 -FileSize -- size of file in KBytes, default is 1024 KBytes

It is the similar to mkfile on Solaris.

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I'd rather not have to download the resource kit. –  Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 18:42
    
you would only need the 1 exe from the resource kit, you don't have to have the whole thing on your production system. –  Byron Whitlock Jun 11 '09 at 18:51
    
I'll give it a try, but I'd rather not have the additional file dependency. –  Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 19:30
    
The file isn't downloading correctly for me now, but I can't imagine it being faster than the Contig tool mentioned by Johannes Rossel. –  Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 21:30
    
Thanks! The downloaded package is rktools.exe and it's 11.7 MB and 18.2 MB when expanded. Oh, and that's "creatfil.exe" and not "createfil.exe". This file alone is 5.5 KB in size and that's all you really need. It took me less than 1 minute to generate a 1 GB file on a quad core 3.0 GHz Intel cpu. With the fsutil.exe tool as posted above, it only takes a fraction of a second to create it. So it's true, that tool creates sparse files. It's even bigger, it's 73,5 KB. This one is better for generating large files for testing purposes. –  sammyg Nov 2 '13 at 17:45

Check out RDFC http://www.bertel.de/software/rdfc/index-en.html

RDFC is probably not the fastest but it does allocate data blocks. The absolutely fastest would have to use lower level API to just obtain cluster chains and put them into MFT without writing data.

Beware that there's no silver bullet here - if "creation" returns instnatly that means you got a sparse file which just fakes a large file but you won't get data blocks/chains till you write into it. If you just read is you'd get very fast zeros whihc could make you believe that your drive all of the sudden got blazingly fast :-)

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This seems to be the best answer. FSUTIL creates a sparse file which is not a valid test scenario for many cases. Sysinternals contig never seems to work for me, when I use a command like "contig -n largefile.bin 6000000000 it creates a file 1.7GB in size...??? Thanks for RDFC because it worked perfectly the first try and writes at the max write speed of my ATA disk. –  Syclone0044 Jun 18 '13 at 1:41
    
For me this is the best util. Simple and works correctly. –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Jan 4 at 20:14

I needed a regular 10 GB file for testing, so I couldn't use fsutil because it creates sparse files (thanks @ZXX).

@echo off

:: Create file with 2 bytes
echo.>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 1 KB
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 9) do type file-big.txt>>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 1 MB
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 10) do type file-big.txt>>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 1 GB
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 10) do type file-big.txt>>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 4 GB
del file-4gb.txt
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 4) do type file-big.txt>>file-4gb.txt

del file-big.txt

I wanted to create a 10 GB file, but for some reason it only showed up as 4 GB, so I wanted to be safe and stopped at 4 GB. If you really want to be sure your file will be handled properly by the operating system and other applications, stop expanding it at 1 GB.

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You need to use a single percent character, not double. Also, you don't need the extra spaces in the parentheses. I'll edit that for you. –  sammyg Nov 2 '13 at 21:19
    
What operating system did you use here mate? The rm is a Unix/Linux command, while del is a DOS/Windows command?... –  sammyg Nov 2 '13 at 21:39
    
Is this supposed to be a batch file or are you supposed to issue these commands straight up in cmd? Single percent sign is used in cmd, like %i but in a batch file you use double percent sign, like %%i. –  sammyg Nov 2 '13 at 21:50
    
@Sammy: It starts with @echo off, so it's obviously a .bat. That's why it had double percent signs. –  f.ardelian Nov 2 '13 at 21:52
    
Alright, then we might want to bring back the double percent sign. Why do you delete file-4gb.txt before you create it? Wouldn't that result in error? Did you actually meant to create file-4gb.txt on that line? Or rename the old file-big.txt file? This is unclear, even for a batch file. If you meant to rename it, then the command you were looking for is probably ren. Like ren file-big.txt file-4gb.txt. I think you confused that with rm. –  sammyg Nov 2 '13 at 22:01
/*
creates an empty file, which can take 
all of the disk space. Just specify the desired file
size in the command line
*/
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main (int argc, char* ARGV[])
{
    int size;
    size = atoi(ARGV[1]);
    const char* full = "fulldisk.dsk";
    HANDLE hf = CreateFile(full, 
                           GENERIC_WRITE, 
                           0,
                           0,
                           CREATE_ALWAYS,
                           0,
                           0);
    SetFilePointer(hf, size, 0, FILE_BEGIN);
    SetEndOfFile(hf);
    CloseHandle(hf);	
    return 0;
}
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Found an excellent utility that is configurable at https://github.com/SL5R0/GenFile.

It fills the target file with random data, so there are no problems with sparse files, and for my purposes (testing compression algorithms) it gives a nice level of white noise.

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This utility is a single file Java application that should work on any platform with Java. –  Paul Jul 23 '12 at 3:07

Short of writing a full application, us Python guys can achieve files of any size with 4 lines, same snippet on Windows and Linux (os.stat() line is just a check).

>>> f = open('myfile.txt','w')
>>> f.seek(1024-1) # an example, pick any size
>>> f.write('\x00')
>>> f.close()
>>> os.stat('myfile.txt').st_size
1024L
>>>
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Installing Python to solve one problem is really overkill. Why not just use something built in such as Powershell or C# - gist.github.com/nadams810/6539070 (you don't even need Visual Studio to compile C# applications). –  Nathan Adams Sep 12 '13 at 15:26
    
.Net, C# and Powershell are not necessarily cross platform. –  gimel Sep 12 '13 at 16:48
    
They are built into Windows which is what the OP asked for (assuming your system is fully up to date). –  Nathan Adams Sep 12 '13 at 18:22

I found a solution using DEBUG at http://www.scribd.com/doc/445750/Create-a-Huge-File, but I don't know an easy way to script it and it doesn't seem to be able to create files larger than 1 GB.

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1  
can't you create 5 files and then append them ? Create them simultaniously using threading, and then append them :D –  dassouki Jun 11 '09 at 18:44
    
I don't know if I could thread it without doing programming, but yes, I can copy the file a few times to get the size I need. In my case I don't need the file itself to be 5GB, just the space used up. –  Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 18:51
2  
Writing to multiple files using threading sounds like a terrible idea, given how slow hard drives are ... Also, appending them is fairly expensive in terms of time so that probably fails the "quick" criteria. –  Joey Jun 11 '09 at 19:14

Plain ol' C... this builds under Mingw GCC on WinXX and should work on any 'generic' C platform.

Generates null file of specified size. Resultant file is NOT just a directory space-occupier entry, and in fact occupies the specified number of bytes. This is fast because no actual writes occur except for the byte written before close. My instance produces a file full of zeros - this could vary by platform; this prgm essentially sets up the directory structure for whatever data is hanging around.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

FILE *file;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    unsigned long  size;

    if(argc!=3)
    {
        printf("Error ... syntax: Fillerfile  size  Fname \n\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    size = atoi(&*argv[1]);

    printf("Creating %d byte file '%s'...\n", size, &*argv[2]);

    if(!(file = fopen(&*argv[2], "w+")))
    {
        printf("Error opening file %s!\n\n" , &*argv[2]);
        exit(1);
    }

    fseek(file, size-1, SEEK_SET);
    fprintf(file, "%c", 0x00);
    fclose(file);
}
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I suggest you to check how I formatted your code. And BTW. the question already has a very good answer, and the fseek+fwrite was already presented in Pyton and WinAPI so this is little of a help. It's nice however you've provided a complete example. +1 for that. But try to not re-answer already solved questions, its just waste of the time in which you could help someone a bit more :) –  quetzalcoatl Aug 10 '12 at 22:34

You can try this C++ code:

    #include<stdlib.h>
    #include<iostream>
    #include<conio.h>
    #include<fstream>
    #using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
        int a;
        ofstream fcout ("big_file.txt");
        for(;;a += 1999999999){
            do{
                fcout<<a;
            }
            while(!a);
        }
    }

maybe it will take some time to generate depending on your CPU speed...

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Simple Answer in python, If you need to create a large real text file I just used a simple while loop and was able to create a 5GB file in about 20 seconds. I know its crude but it is fast enough.

 outfile=open("outfile.log","a+")
 def write(outfile):
     outfile.write("hello world hello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello world"+"\n")
     return
 i=0
 while i < 1000000:
    write(outfile)
     i+=1
 outfile.close()
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