Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a program and part of it requires me to create a struct called DETAILS with the fields name, age, and height. I want to populate the record with data using a function argument. I had numerous problems with this code and had lots of help from here but need a little more. I can't output the populated struct to the screen. If anyone could help me with this last thing I would be so grateful!

Here is my code:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

const int LEN=100;

struct DETAILS
{
 char name[LEN];
 int age;
 double height;
};

 DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, const char[LEN], int, double);


int main()
{
 struct DETAILS David;

 fillperson(struct DETAILS David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0);

 cout<<David.name<<endl;
 cout<<David.age<<endl;
 cout<<David.height<<endl;

 return 0;
}

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, char name[LEN], int age, double height) 
{
 cout<<"Done"<<endl;
 return;
}
share|improve this question
    
I put them in as comments beside the lines they are referencing –  adohertyd Mar 22 '12 at 17:27
1  
You are mixing struct DETAILS and struct person. There is no struct person definition in your code, but you create a struct person instance called David. Change that first line in main from struct person David; to struct DETAILS David; and it should work. –  Spidey Mar 22 '12 at 17:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
DETAILS fillperson(David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0); //deprecated conversion from string constant to char * [-Wwrite-Strings]

This is because string literals (like "David Greene") are const, and you're passing it as just a char[LEN]. Try const char[LEN].

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS, char[LEN] name, int age, double height) //expected , or ... before 'name'

The [] goes after the name of the variable: char name[LEN].

Also, where is this David variable coming from? The name of the variable needs to be in the function signature (struct DETAILS David, not just struct DETAILS).

cin>>David.name>>name;

I think what you really want is:

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, const char name[LEN], int age, double height)

EDIT:

I think you misunderstood what I was saying. This line is a weird mix of function definition of function call.

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0);

When you call a function, you don't declare types:

fillperson(David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0);

But you do need them in the actual function definition, so instead of this:

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS, char[LEN] name, int age, double height) 

Do this:

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, char name[LEN], int age, double height)

EDIT 2:

Also, I don't know what you're trying to do here (or any of the similar lines):

cin>>David.name>>name;

Are you trying to copy the string? (See strncpy) or read input (cin >> David.name)?

Recommendation

If you're using C++ and C++ input streams, you should really just use string.

EDIT 3

Your current code won't work for several reasons:

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, char name[LEN], int age, double height) 
{
    cout<<"Done"<<endl;
    return;
}

The function signature says the function returns DETAILS (the first part of the line), but you don't return anything. Either return the input struct:

return David;

Or make the method return void (nothing):

void fillperson(...

My recommendation about using string is that it's much easier to work with than straight character arrays (char[]):

string name = "David"; string name2 = name; // Copying is much easier

So for example, your code could look like this:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

struct DETAILS
{
    string name;
    int age;
    double height;
};

// Note that I'm passing a reference for DETAILS (the &). This means
// that we have access to the actual DETAILS instance from outside
// the method, not just a copy.
void fillperson(struct DETAILS&, const string, int, double);

int main()
{
    struct DETAILS David;

    fillperson(David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0);

    cout<<David.name<<endl;
    cout<<David.age<<endl;
    cout<<David.height<<endl;

    return 0;
}

void fillperson(struct DETAILS &person, const string name, int age, double height) 
{
    person.name = name;
    person.age = age;
    person.height = height;
    cout<<"Done"<<endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry the person tag should not have been in my code. I amended it here and I implemented the changes you suggested however I am getting a lot of strange compiler errors now such as this: /usr/include/c++/4.6/iomanip:229:5: note: template<class _CharT, class _Traits> std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator>>(std::basic_istream<_CharT, _Traits>&, std::_Setw) –  adohertyd Mar 22 '12 at 17:41
    
@adohertyd - See my edit. –  Brendan Long Mar 22 '12 at 17:47
    
Thanks so much Brendan. I have been at it so long I completely muddled up the code and ruined it then couldn't see the obvious errors. I just deleted the cin statements and it worked. Thanks so much for the help really appreciate it. –  adohertyd Mar 22 '12 at 17:58
    
What do you mean by just use string? Instead of what? Also, if you wouldn't mind taking another quick look at my question, I've come up against another error! –  adohertyd Mar 22 '12 at 18:15
    
@adohertyd - Edited it again. –  Brendan Long Mar 22 '12 at 20:09
person fillperson(struct DETAILS, char[LEN] name, int age, double height)

should be:

struct person fillperson(struct DETAILS,char name[LEN], int age, double height)

I can't give you a more complete answer without the definition of struct person

edit:

This line doesn't make any sense:

DETAILS fillperson(struct DETAILS David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0);

Perhaps it should be:

fillperson(struct DETAILS David, "David Greene", 38, 180.0);

As stated above, you shouldn't be using C-style strings with C++ streams. Pick a language and use those constructs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I have updated my code and my question. Would you mind please taking another look? Would really appreciate it thanks! –  adohertyd Mar 22 '12 at 17:44
    
Thanks for the input. Have another edit to the question if you wouldn't mind. I'm new to structs and this should be basic but I just can't get it to work. Also. what do you mean by using strings vs streams? –  adohertyd Mar 22 '12 at 18:14
    
@adohertyd - If you add #include <string>, it works perfectly. Tested in VS –  prelic Mar 23 '12 at 15:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.