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I have a JPanel in a JFrame that contains 5 buttons. In another JPanel there is a button called "delete button", what I want to do is to click this button and than choose what button of the other 5 to delete by ckicking in one of them. Can anyone help me?

    public class gui extends JFrame implements ActionListener
    {
      JPanel p1 = new JPanel();
      JPanel p2 = new JPanel();
      JPanel p2 = new JPanel();

      JButton b1 = new JButton("Delete");
      JButton b2 = new JButton("A");
      JButton b3 = new JButton("B");
      JButton b4 = new JButton("C");

      gui()
      {
        p1.setLayout(new GridLayout(1,2));
        p1.add(p2);
        p1.add(p3);

        p2.setLayout(new GridLayout(3,1));
        p2.add(b2);
        p2.add(b3);
        p2.add(b4);
        p3.add(b1);

        b1.addActionListener(this);
        b2.addActionListener(this);
        b3.addActionListener(this);
        b4.addActionListener(this);

      }

     public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
     {
       if (e.getSource() == b1)
         // When I click this button I want to be able to delete a button of my choice (one of the other 3)
     }
   }
share|improve this question
2  
We might be able to help you if you would put more effort into your question: What did you try already? Any short but relevant code example? –  Thomas Mar 22 '12 at 17:39
    
Use a boolean variable that indicates that the next button clicked will be "deleted". When the other buttons are clicked if the variable is set to true then set the visibility of the button to false. Initialize the boolean variable to false again. –  Marcelo Mar 22 '12 at 17:45
2  
When you submit code, make sure it runs. This saves other's time and allows them to focus on the question asked. Adding a main method, packing your elements, setting a default close operation, including the include statements, and adding your components to the JFrame is not too much to ask. –  Edwin Buck Mar 22 '12 at 19:43
    
"I have a JPanel in a JFrame that contains 5 buttons." What do the buttons do? This might be better suited to many elements in one JList –  Andrew Thompson Mar 22 '12 at 20:26

4 Answers 4

Here's a snippet of code to kick you off in the right direction:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import javax.swing.*;

public class FrameTestBase extends JFrame {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        FrameTestBase t = new FrameTestBase();

        final JPanel p = new JPanel();

        final JButton button = new JButton();

        button.setAction(new AbstractAction("Remove me!") {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                p.remove(button);
                p.revalidate();
                p.repaint();
            }
        });

        p.add(button);
        t.setContentPane(p);

        t.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        t.setSize(400, 400);
        t.setVisible(true);
    }
}

Before click:

After click:

share|improve this answer
    
that's what i have more or less, but what you have shown deletes the button itself, what I actually want is to have a button that deletes another... –  Gonçalo Reino da Costa Mar 22 '12 at 17:52
    
Then just set the AbstractAction that deletes button A as the action for button B. –  aioobe Mar 22 '12 at 17:53
    
I am not making myself clear, the A button the ones that says something like "DELETE" will delete another button that may differ from time to timem meaning I may want to delete button C once and then button E –  Gonçalo Reino da Costa Mar 22 '12 at 17:58
    
Ok, So create a general AbstractAction that takes which button to delet as a parameter. Update the action of button A to an action deleting whatever button you want to be deleted when clicking on A. –  aioobe Mar 22 '12 at 18:12

Have a look at the glass pane. This tutorial shows how it is used.

At a high level, clicking the 'Delete' button would put the glass pane listener into a state where it:

  1. detects a click,
  2. determines the target component,
  3. determines whether the component is allowed to be deleted
  4. and if so, delete the component.

As a design note, I would keep a Set of controls that are allowed to be deleted, and thereby separate the concerns. So when you add a button that is allowed to be deleted, it is your responsibility to also add it to the delete candidates set.

share|improve this answer

Here try this code out :

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class DeleteButtonExample extends JFrame
{
    private boolean deleteNow = false;
    private JButton deleteButton;
    private JPanel leftPanel;
    private JPanel rightPanel;
    private JButton[] buttons = new JButton[5];

    private ActionListener deleteAction = new ActionListener()
    {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae)
        {
            JButton button = (JButton) ae.getSource();
            if (deleteNow)
            {
                leftPanel.remove(button);
                leftPanel.revalidate();
                leftPanel.repaint();
                deleteNow = false;
            }
            else
            {
                // Do your normal Event Handling here.
                System.out.println("My COMMAND IS : " + button.getActionCommand());
            }
        }
    };

    private void createAndDisplayGUI()
    {
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setLocationByPlatform(true);
        setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 2));

        leftPanel = new JPanel();
        leftPanel.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 2));
        leftPanel.setBackground(Color.WHITE);
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            buttons[i] = new JButton("" + i);
            buttons[i].addActionListener(deleteAction);
            buttons[i].setActionCommand("" + i);
            leftPanel.add(buttons[i]);
        }

        rightPanel = new JPanel();
        rightPanel.setBackground(Color.BLUE);

        JButton deleteButton = new JButton("DELETE");
        deleteButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
        {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae)
            {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Delete any Button from the Left Panel by clicking it."
                                                                                    , "INFO : ", JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
                deleteNow = true;                                                                   
            }
        });
        rightPanel.add(deleteButton);

        add(leftPanel);
        add(rightPanel);
        pack();
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String... args)
    {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                new DeleteButtonExample().createAndDisplayGUI();
            }
        });
    }
}

OUTPUT :

FIRST WINDOW, WHEN YOU CLICKED DELETE BUTTON, AFTER YOU CLICK THE BUTTON ON LEFT PANEL IT WILL BE DELETED AS SHOWN HERE

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but your buttons are shouting! :-) –  trashgod Mar 27 '12 at 16:50

Use a chain of responsibility in the button listeners. One Button listener that listens for the "to be deleted" buttons and the "delete" button. Under normal operation this button listener just sends the "to be deleted" button events to the existing button events, but when it hears a "delete" button event, it then captures the "next" button event without sending it to the existing button listener, and acts to remove the button.

Ok you provided some code. Here is a solution that uses a chain of responsibility. Basically, if one ActionListener can't handle the event, it sends it to the next one, and so on.

import java.awt.GridLayou;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.WindowConstants;

public class Gui extends JFrame {

  public static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

  JPanel p1 = new JPanel();
  JPanel p2 = new JPanel();
  JPanel p3 = new JPanel();

  JButton b1 = new JButton("Delete");
  JButton b2 = new JButton("A");
  JButton b3 = new JButton("B");
  JButton b4 = new JButton("C");

  public Gui() {

    setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

    p1.setLayout(new GridLayout(1, 2));
    p1.add(p2);
    p2.add(p3);

    p2.setLayout(new GridLayout(3, 1));
    p2.add(b2);
    p2.add(b3);
    p2.add(b4);

    p3.add(b1);

    DoItListener doIt = new DoItListener(null);
    DeleteItListener deleteIt = new DeleteItListener(this, doIt);

    b1.addActionListener(deleteIt);
    b2.addActionListener(deleteIt);
    b3.addActionListener(deleteIt);
    b4.addActionListener(deleteIt);

    add(p1);
    pack();
  }

  public void deleteButton(String name) {
    if (b2 != null && "A".equals(name)) {
      p2.remove(b2);
      b2 = null;
      p2.invalidate();
      p2.redraw();
    }
    if (b3 != null && "B".equals(name)) {
      p2.remove(b3);
      b3 = null;
      p2.invalidate();
      p2.redraw();
    }
    if (b4 != null && "A".equals(name)) {
      p2.remove(b4);
      b4 = null;
      p2.invalidate();
      p2.redraw();
    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
      public void run() {
        new Gui().setVisible(true);
      }
    });
  }
}

class DoItListener implements ActionListener {

  private ActionListener delegate;

  public DoItListener(ActionListener next) {
    delegate = next;
  }

  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    if (!("Delete".equals(e.getActionCommand()))) {
      System.out.println("doing " + e.getActionCommand());
    } else if (delegate != null) {
      delegate.actionPerformed(e);
    }
  }
}

class DeleteItListener implements ActionListener {

  private Gui gui;

  private boolean deleteNext;

  private ActionListener delegate;

  public DeleteItListener(Gui container, ActionListener next) {
    gui = container;
    delegate = next;
    deleteNext = false;
  }

  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    if ("Delete".equals(e.getActionCommand())) {
      deleteNext = true;
    } else if (deleteNext) {
      gui.deleteButton(e.getActionCommand());
      deleteNext = false;
    } else if (delegate != null) {
      delegate.actionPerformed(e);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
do you have any suggestions for the code? I am sorry but I am a beginner and I am not quite sure what you ment... –  Gonçalo Reino da Costa Mar 22 '12 at 17:51
    
How much of a beginner are you? Can you draw your window with your five (or more) buttons? If you can, please post the code. If you don't know what a chain of responsibility is, Google can provide you with more (and better) examples than I can quickly demonstrate. –  Edwin Buck Mar 22 '12 at 17:56
    
yeah I can even do more than that, I will try to figure what a chain of responsibility is then... thanks anyway –  Gonçalo Reino da Costa Mar 22 '12 at 18:01
    
If you post the code for the buttons, and take a stab at writing a button listener or two, then I'll be glad to help in getting it working. If you only provide a general description of the task, you'll at best get a general description of the solution. –  Edwin Buck Mar 22 '12 at 18:07
    
ok fair enough... –  Gonçalo Reino da Costa Mar 22 '12 at 18:12

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