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I have a python dictionary of type defaultdict(list) This dictionary is something like this:

a = {1:[1,2,3,4],2:[5,6,7,8]....n:[some 4 elements]}

So basically it has n keys which has a list as values and all the list are of same lenght. Now, i want to build a list which has something like this.

[[1,5,...first element of all the list], [2,6.. second element of all the list]... and so on]

Soo basically how do i get the kth value from all the keys.. Is there a pythonic way to do this.. ?? THanks

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1  
I'd describe your problem as striping your arrays (or in matrix-talk, switching from row-first to column-first ordering). I don't do Python however so others will have to help you with specific code :) –  Blindy Mar 22 '12 at 18:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted
>>> a = {1:[1,2,3,4],2:[5,6,7,8], 3:[9, 10, 11, 12]}
>>> 
>>> zip(*(a[k] for k in sorted(a)))
[(1, 5, 9), (2, 6, 10), (3, 7, 11), (4, 8, 12)]

(Okay, this produces tuples, not lists, but hopefully that's not a problem.)

Update: I like the above more than this, but the following is a few keystrokes shorter:

>>> zip(*map(a.get, sorted(a)))
[(1, 5, 9), (2, 6, 10), (3, 7, 11), (4, 8, 12)]
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+1. Order is apparently important for the OP. –  Manoj Govindan Mar 22 '12 at 18:19

How about this solution: zip(*a.values())

For e.g.

>>> a = {1:[1,2,3,4],2:[5,6,7,8], 3:[9, 10, 11, 12]}
>>> zip(*a.values())
[(1, 5, 9), (2, 6, 10), (3, 7, 11), (4, 8, 12)]

Update: to preserve order use DSM's answer.

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Clearly the point of having numerically increasing keys is to provide a sort order to be applied to the values; this solution doesn't do that, as given. –  Charles Duffy Mar 22 '12 at 18:17
    
See other answers. You'll need to sort the keys. –  Manoj Govindan Mar 22 '12 at 18:17

An alternative way to do this using numpy:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = {1:[1,2,3,4],2:[5,6,7,8], 3:[9, 10, 11, 12]}
>>> x = numpy.zeros((len(a),4), dtype=int)
>>> x[[i-1 for i in a.keys()]] = a.values()
>>> x.T
array([[ 1,  5,  9],
       [ 2,  6, 10],
       [ 3,  7, 11],
       [ 4,  8, 12]])
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List comprehension makes this easy. To get a list of the kth items:

k = 1 
[a[key][k] for key in sorted(a.keys())]

The to build a list of lists:

[ [a[key][k] for key in sorted(a.keys())] for k in range(len(a[1]))]
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if you want list of lists (assuming each list is of length=4):

>>> a = {1:[1, 2, 3, 4], 2:[5, 6, 7, 8], 3:[9, 10, 11, 12]}
>>> [[a[key][x] for key in sorted(a.keys())] for x in xrange(4)]
[[1, 5, 9], [2, 6, 10], [3, 7, 11], [4, 8, 12]]
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