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I have to update a field with a value which is returned by a join of 3 tables.

Example:

select
    im.itemid
    ,im.sku as iSku
    ,gm.SKU as GSKU
    ,mm.ManufacturerId as ManuId
    ,mm.ManufacturerName
    ,im.mf_item_number
    ,mm.ManufacturerID
from 
    item_master im, group_master gm, Manufacturer_Master mm 
where
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    and im.sku=gm.sku
    and gm.ManufacturerID = mm.ManufacturerID
    and gm.manufacturerID=34

I want to update the mf_item_number field values of table item_master with some other value which is joined in the above condition.

How can I do this in MS SQL Server?

share|improve this question
    
That depends on the database you are using. –  RedFilter Jun 11 '09 at 18:54
    
What SQL Server do you use? –  VVS Jun 11 '09 at 18:55
    
SQL server 2005 –  Shyju Jun 11 '09 at 18:55
    
I used nested subqueries to got this working –  Shyju Jun 11 '09 at 19:13
40  
Please stop using those implied joins to begin with. It's a poor technique that leads to incorrect results due to unexpected cross joins. This code style is 18 years out of date –  HLGEM Feb 3 '10 at 15:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 350 down vote accepted

Edit: changed to ANSI joins

UPDATE
    im
SET
    mf_item_number = gm.SKU --etc
FROM
    item_master im
    JOIN
    group_master gm ON im.sku=gm.sku 
    JOIN
    Manufacturer_Master mm ON gm.ManufacturerID=mm.ManufacturerID
WHERE
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    AND
    gm.manufacturerID=34

Edit, Nov 2011

To make it clear... The UPDATE clause can refer to an table alias specified in the FROM clause. So im in this case is valid

Edit, Aug 2012

Generic example

UPDATE
    A
SET
    foo = B.bar
FROM
    TableA A
    JOIN
    TableB B ON A.col1 = B.colx
WHERE
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
im is an alias not a table name... –  RedFilter Jun 11 '09 at 18:57
8  
im is an alias, not a table name - and that is exactly what is needed here. +1 –  David B Jun 11 '09 at 18:58
14  
I'd give you even more upvotes if I could for getting rid of that old style syntax. –  HLGEM Jun 11 '09 at 19:00
3  
@VVS: no, it shouldn't be –  gbn Dec 21 '09 at 7:35
4  
@gbn - Necromancy I know but your answer just saved my arse on a remote support call where tables had to be updated based on a string match of a name...using a join statement. Worked beautifully, by following your example. So thank you! –  Richard Feb 1 '13 at 18:01

One of the easiest way is to use a common table expression (since you're already on SQL 2005):

with cte as (
select
    im.itemid
    ,im.sku as iSku
    ,gm.SKU as GSKU
    ,mm.ManufacturerId as ManuId
    ,mm.ManufacturerName
    ,im.mf_item_number
    ,mm.ManufacturerID
    , <your other field>
from 
    item_master im, group_master gm, Manufacturer_Master mm 
where
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    and im.sku=gm.sku
    and gm.ManufacturerID = mm.ManufacturerID
    and gm.manufacturerID=34)
update cte set mf_item_number = <your other field>

The query execution engine will figure out on its own how to update the record.

share|improve this answer
2  
Excellent, the use of the CTE makes it simple to convert the original SELECT into an UPDATE –  SteveC Jun 14 '13 at 14:48

Adapting this to MySQL -- there is no FROM clause in UPDATE, but this works:

UPDATE
    item_master im
    JOIN
    group_master gm ON im.sku=gm.sku 
    JOIN
    Manufacturer_Master mm ON gm.ManufacturerID=mm.ManufacturerID
SET
    im.mf_item_number = gm.SKU --etc
WHERE
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    AND
    gm.manufacturerID=34
share|improve this answer
    

You can specify additional tables used in determining how and what to update with the "FROM " clause in the UPDATE statement, like this:

update item_master
set mf_item_number = (some value)
from 
   group_master as gm
   join Manufacturar_Master as mm ON ........
where
 .... (your conditions here)

In the WHERE clause, you need to provide the conditions and join operations to bind these tables together.

Marc

share|improve this answer
3  
..or use ANSI JOINS in the FROM clause –  gbn Jun 11 '09 at 18:59
3  
Yes please use the ansi joins, you could be in real trouble in an update if you accidentally got a cross join. –  HLGEM Jun 11 '09 at 19:01
    
Yes, good point - that works too, of course! –  marc_s Jun 11 '09 at 19:01

Did not use your sql above but here is an example of updating a table based on a join statement.

update p set p.category = c.category
from products p
inner join prodductcatagories pg on p.productid = pg.productid
inner join categories c on pg.categoryid = c.cateogryid
where c.categories like 'whole%'

share|improve this answer
MySQL: In general, make necessary changes par your requirement:

UPDATE
    shopping_cart sc
    LEFT JOIN
    package pc ON sc. package_id = pc.id    
SET
    sc. amount = pc.amount
share|improve this answer
    
Please add some details in your answer to make it more useful for all readers. –  Mohit Jain Aug 1 at 11:48

Self joining is used within a table.

create table [master](channelid int,Curl nvarchar(100),Adminurl nvarchar(100),Publicurl nvarchar(100),channelName nvarchar(20),createddate datetime)

insert into [master] values(736,'www.yahoo.com','www.yahoo.com/admin','www.yahoo.com','yahoo',GETDATE())

insert into [master] values(735,'www.google.com','www.google.com/admin','www.google.com','google',GETDATE())

insert into [master] values(736,'www.hotmail.com','www.hotmail.com/admin','www.hotmail.com','hotmail',GETDATE())

select * from master 

update a  set a.Adminurl=b.Curl from master a join master b on a.channelid=b.channelid.

if any doubt, let me know.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not entirely sure what this had to do with the question. Self joining just to set one column to the value of another is a bit... well, silly is probably the politest word. –  Chris Lively Aug 22 '13 at 18:59

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