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I have one file (for example: test.txt), this file contains some lines and for example one line is: abcd=11 But it can be for example: abcd=12 Number is different but abcd= is the same in all case, so could anybody give me command for finding this line and remove it?

I have tried: sed -e \"/$abcd=/d\" /test.txt >/test.txt but it removes all lines from my file and I also have tried: sed -e \"/$abcd=/d\" /test.txt >/testNew.txt but it doesn't delete line from test.txt, it only creates new file (testNew.txt) and in this file it removes my line. But it is not what I want.

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1  
$abcd is going to be parsed out by the shell. If that shell var's not defined, it'll be effectively "deleted" from the arguments. That'd make your sed call \"/=/d\" and toast all lines that have a = in them. –  Marc B Mar 22 '12 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Based on your description in your text, here is a cleaned-up version of your sed script that should work.

Assuming a linux GNU sed

sed -i '/abcd=/d' /test.txt 

If you're using OS-X, then you need

sed -i "" '/abcd=/d' /test.txt 

If these don't work, then use old-school sed with a conditional mv to manage your tmpfiles.

sed '/abcd=/d' /test.txt > test.txt.$$ && /bin/mv test.txt.$$ test.txt

Notes:

Not sure why you're doing \"/$abcd=/d\", you don't need to escape " chars unless you're doing more with this code than you indicate (like using eval). Just write it as "/$abcd=/d".

Normally you don't need '-e'

If you really want to use '$abcd, then you need to give it a value AND as you're matching the string 'abcd=', then you can do

 abcd='abcd='
 sed -i "/${abcd}/d" /test.txt 

I hope this helps.

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Here's a solution using grep:

$ grep -v '^\$abcd=' test.txt

Proof of concept:

$ cat test.txt
a
b
ab
ac
$abcd=1
$abcd=2
$abcd
ab
a
$abcd=3
x

$ grep -v '^\$abcd=' test.txt
a
b
ab
ac
$abcd
ab
a
x
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It doesn't work, it doesn't remove that line from my file. –  Adam Mar 22 '12 at 19:53
    
Weird, worked fine on mine. Perhaps different versions of GNU grep in use here... –  Al G Mar 22 '12 at 19:57

As far as I know, this command can be used to create some other file with the deleted lines. Now that we have another file we can rename that file and delete the original file if we want. You will just have to do this

       grep -v '^\$abcd=' test.txt > tmp.txt

now tmp.txt will have contents

a
b
ab
ac
$abcd
ab
a
x

If you want you may rename this to test.txt after deleting test.txt

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