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I am just wondering if there would be any loss of speed or efficiency if you did something like this:

int i = 0;
while(i < 100)
{
    int var = 4;
    i++;
}

which declares int var one hundred times. It seems to me like there would be, but I'm not sure. would it be more practical/faster to do this instead:

int i = 0;
int var;
while(i < 100)
{
    var = 4;
    i++;
}

or are they the same, speedwise and efficiency-wise?

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3  
To be clear, the above code does not "declare" var one hundred times. –  Jason Jun 11 '09 at 19:22
    
@Matt - Didn't see that; I just fixed it now. –  user98188 Jul 7 '10 at 21:22
    
This is an exact duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/407255/… –  Rabarberski Oct 7 '11 at 20:02
    
@Rabarberski: The referenced question is not an exact duplicate as it does not specify a language. This question is specific to C++. But according to the answers posted to your referenced question, the answer depends on the language and possibly the compiler. –  DavidRR Jul 16 '13 at 18:28

12 Answers 12

up vote 106 down vote accepted

Stack space for local variables is usually allocated in function scope. So no stack pointer adjustment happens inside the loop, just assigning 4 to var. Therefore these two snippets have the same overhead.

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3  
+1 This is the most correct answer so far... –  Zifre Jun 11 '09 at 19:09
26  
I wish those guys who teach at out college at least knew this basic thing. Once he laughed at me declaring a variable inside a loop and I was wondering what's wrong until he cited performance as the reason not to do so and I was like "WTF!?". –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 11 '09 at 19:35
9  
Are you sure you should be talking about stack space right away. A variable like this could also be in a register. –  toto Jun 25 '09 at 11:46

For primitive types and POD types, it makes no difference. The compiler will allocate the stack space for the variable at the beginning of the function and deallocate it when the function returns in both cases.

For non-POD class types that have non-trivial constructors, it WILL make a difference -- in that case, putting the variable outside the loop will only call the constructor and destructor once and the assignment operator each iteration, whereas putting it inside the loop will call the constructor and destructor for every iteration of the loop. Depending on what the class' constructor, destructor, and assignment operator do, this may or may not be desirable.

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This doesn't seem true. If you use a nonPOD type and assign it in the loop over and over again as in his example, that assignment to a new variable is calling the constructor over and over again, too. –  Brian Jun 11 '09 at 19:16
22  
Correct idea wrong reason. Variable outside the loop. Constructed once, destroyed once but asignment operator applied every iteration. Variable inside the loop. Constructe/Desatructor aplied every iteration but zero assignment operations. –  Loki Astari Jun 11 '09 at 19:34
3  
This is the best answer but these comments are confusing. There's a big difference between calling a constructor and an assignment operator. –  Andrew Grant Jun 11 '09 at 19:50
1  
It is true if the loop body does the assignment anyway, not just for initialization. And if there's just a body-independent/constant initialization, the optimizer can hoist it. –  peterchen Jun 11 '09 at 19:59
4  
@Andrew Grant: Why. Assignment operator is usually defined as copy construct into tmp followed by swap (to be exception safe) followed by destroy tmp. Thus assignment operator is not that different to construction/destroy cycle above. See stackoverflow.com/questions/255612/… for example of typical assignment operator. –  Loki Astari Jun 12 '09 at 8:32

They are both the same, and here's how you can find out, by looking at what the compiler does (even without optimisation set to high):

Look at what the compiler (gcc 4.0) does to your simple examples:

1.c:

main(){ int var; while(int i < 100) { var = 4; } }

gcc -S 1.c

1.s:

_main:
    pushl	%ebp
    movl	%esp, %ebp
    subl	$24, %esp
    movl	$0, -16(%ebp)
    jmp	L2
L3:
    movl	$4, -12(%ebp)
L2:
    cmpl	$99, -16(%ebp)
    jle	L3
    leave
    ret

2.c

main() { while(int i < 100) { int var = 4; } }

gcc -S 2.c

2.s:

_main:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $24, %esp
        movl    $0, -16(%ebp)
        jmp     L2
L3:
        movl    $4, -12(%ebp)
L2:
        cmpl    $99, -16(%ebp)
        jle     L3
        leave
        ret

From these, you can see two things: firstly, the code is the same in both.

Secondly, the storage for var is allocated outside the loop:

         subl    $24, %esp

And finally the only thing in the loop is the assignment and condition check:

L3:
        movl    $4, -12(%ebp)
L2:
        cmpl    $99, -16(%ebp)
        jle     L3

Which is about as efficient as you can be without removing the loop entirely.

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2  
"Which is about as efficient as you can be without removing the loop entirely" Not quite. Partially unrolling the loop (doing it say 4 times per pass) would speed it up dramatically. There are probably many other ways to optimize... although most modern compilers would probably realize that there's no point in looping at all. If 'i' was used later, it'd simply set 'i' = 100. –  darron Sep 27 '09 at 22:18
    
that's assuming the code changed to incremented 'i' at all... as is it's just a forever loop. –  darron Sep 27 '09 at 22:20
    
As was the Original Post! –  Alex Brown Jun 21 at 1:09
    
I like answers that back the theory with proof! Nice to see ASM dump backing up the theory of being equal codes. +1 –  Xavi Montero Aug 27 at 23:40

These days it is better to declare it inside the loop unless it is a constant as the compiler will be able to better optimize the code (reducing variable scope).

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3  
I doubt it will affect optimization -- if the compiler performs any sort of data flow analysis, it can figure out that it's not being modified outside the loop, so it should produce the same optimized code in both cases. –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 11 '09 at 19:07
3  
It won't figure it out if you have two different loops using the same temp variable name though. –  Joshua Jun 11 '09 at 19:26

Most modern compilers will optimize this for you. That being said I would use your first example as I find it more readable.

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2  
I don't really count it as an optimization. Since they are local variables, the stack space is just allocated at the beginning of the function. There's no real "creation" involved to harm performance (unless a constructor is being called, which is completely another story). –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 11 '09 at 19:06
    
You are right, "optimization" is the wrong word but I am at a loss for a better one. –  Andrew Hare Jun 11 '09 at 19:11
    
problem is that such an optimizer will use live range analysis, and both variables are rather dead. –  MSalters Jun 12 '09 at 15:17
    
How about "the compiler won't see any difference between them once it does the data flow analysis". Personally I prefer that the scope of a variable should be confined to where it is used, not for efficiency but for clarity. –  greggo Mar 5 at 18:54

For a built-in type there will likely be no difference between the 2 styles (probably right down to the generated code).

However, if the variable is a class with a non-trivial constructor/destructor there could well be a major difference in runtime cost. I'd generally scope the variable to inside the loop (to keep the scope as small as possible), but if that turns out to have a perf impact I'd look to moving the class variable outside the loop's scope. However, doing that needs some additional analysis as the semantics of the ode path may change, so this can only be done if the sematics permit it.

An RAII class might need this behavior. For example, a class that manages file access lifetime might need to be created and destroyed on each loop iteration to manage the file access properly.

Suppose you have a LockMgr class that acquires a critical section when it's constructed and releases it when destroyed:

while (i< 100) {
    LockMgr lock( myCriticalSection); // acquires a critical section at start of
                                      //    each loop iteration

    // do stuff...

}   // critical section is released at end of each loop iteration

is quite different from:

LockMgr lock( myCriticalSection);
while (i< 100) {

    // do stuff...

}
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Both loops have the same efficiency. They will both take an infinite amount of time :) It may be a good idea to increment i inside the loops.

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Yes, stack overflow is always the most correct answer! –  Even Mien Jun 11 '09 at 20:45
    
Ah yes, I forgot to address space efficiency - that's ok - 2 ints for both. It just seems odd to me that programmers are missing the forest for the tree -- all these suggestions about some code that doesn't terminate. –  Larry Watanabe Jun 11 '09 at 21:08
    
It's OK if they don't terminate. Neither one of them is called. :-) –  Nosredna Jun 12 '09 at 0:53
    
The question post has been edited to correct this. –  Flimm Nov 14 '13 at 15:42

The only way to be sure is to time them. But the difference, if there is one, will be microscopic, so you will need a mighty big timing loop.

More to the point, the first one is better style because it initializes the variable var, while the other one leaves it uninitialized. This and the guideline that one should define variables as near to their point of use as possible, means that the first form should normally be preferred.

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Wow Neil. Working on a cell phone w/o spell checking? –  crashmstr Jun 11 '09 at 19:06
    
lol Neil you've been making typo-s galore lately :P –  GManNickG Jun 11 '09 at 19:06
3  
To be fair, British English spells a number of words with -ise which would be spelled -ize in American English. –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 11 '09 at 19:08
6  
Thanks for the corrections, but in future, please don't change my English spelling to US spelling. –  anon Jun 11 '09 at 19:10
1  
Do you have a defence? :-) –  Nosredna Jun 12 '09 at 0:51

This not an answer but it does not allow me to add comment yet, so I am posting this way

@lalto, @Alex Do you mean that all variable inside functions are allocated space at the start of function and does it imply that all variables used inside the functions are actually using the memory till the end of the function. e.g. in following function

void MyFunction(void) {
 int a;
 ...
 {
  int b;
  ...
 }
 ...
 {
   int c[50];
   ...
 }
 ...
 int d;
 ...
}

1) Do you mean that a,b,c & d all are allocated space at start of function and memory is not deallocated till the end of function.

2) Why cannot it allocate only when its needed and deallocate when its out of scope?

Thanks

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I don't think it's a hard and fast rule, but yes to 1. One reason it does it at the start is that allocating space for 4 variables on the stack is no more work than allocating 1. The stack pointer is simply advanced by the sum of the sizes of the variables required. Deallocation is similarly cheap, or even free. Note that the storage used only in the inner block scope (b,c) can be shared, ie c can reuse the storage b no longer uses. The cost and timing of constructors and destructors are associated with the actual declarations and scope of the variables. –  Alex Brown Jun 12 '09 at 10:42
    
Actually, with modern optimizers, you can't say a lot about this. The compiler will look at the places where a,b,c and d are actually needed. If the last use of a precedes the first use of d, the compiler can make them share memory. And if there's an early return (eg. checking if an argument is NULL), the optimizer might even delay allocating memory until after that check. –  MSalters Jun 12 '09 at 15:15

With only two variables, the compiler will likely be assign a register for both. These registers are there anyway, so this doesn't take time. There are 2 register write and one register read instruction in either case.

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I think that most answers are missing a major point to consider which is: "Is it clear" and obviously by all the discussion the fact is; no it is not. I'd suggest in most loop code the efficiency is pretty much a non-issue (unless you calculating for a mars lander), so really the only question is what looks more sensible and readable & maintainable - in this case I'd recommend declaring the variable up front & outside the loop - this simply makes it clearer. Then people like you & I would not even bother to waste time checking online to see if it's valid or not.

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thats not true there is overhead however its neglect able overhead.

Even though probably they will end up at same place on stack It still assigns it. It will assign memory location on stack for that int and then free it at the end of }. Not in heap free sense in sense it will move sp (stack pointer) by 1. And in your case considering it only has one local variable it will just simply equate fp(frame pointer) and sp

Short answer would be: DONT CARE EITHER WAY WORKS ALMOST THE SAME.

But try reading more on how stack is organized. My undergrad school had pretty good lectures on that If you wanna read more check here http://www.cs.utk.edu/~plank/plank/classes/cs360/360/notes/Assembler1/lecture.html

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Again, -1 untrue. Read the post that looked at the assembly. –  Bill K Jun 12 '09 at 0:59
    
nope you are wrong. look at the assembler code generated with that code –  grobartn Jun 12 '09 at 13:10

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