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I ran across a problem with a SQL statement today that I was able to fix by adding additional criteria, however I really want to know why my change fixed the problem.

The problem query:

SELECT *
FROM
  (SELECT ah.*,
    com.location,
    ha.customer_number,
    d.name applicance_NAME,
    house.name house_NAME,
    dr.name RULE_NAME
FROM actionhistory ah
INNER JOIN community com
ON (t.city_id = com.city_id)
INNER JOIN house_address ha
ON (t.applicance_id   = ha.applicance_id
AND ha.status_cd = 'ACTIVE')
INNER JOIN applicance d
ON (t.applicance_id = d.applicance_id)
INNER JOIN house house
ON (house.house_id = t.house_id)
LEFT JOIN the_rule tr
ON (tr.the_rule_id = t.the_rule_id)
WHERE actionhistory_id    >= 'ACT100010000' 
ORDER BY actionhistory_id
)
WHERE rownum <= 30000;

The "fix"

SELECT *
FROM
  (SELECT ah.*,
    com.location,
    ha.customer_number,
    d.name applicance_NAME,
    house.name house_NAME,
    dr.name RULE_NAME
FROM actionhistory ah
INNER JOIN community com
ON (t.city_id = com.city_id)
INNER JOIN house_address ha
ON (t.applicance_id   = ha.applicance_id
AND ha.status_cd = 'ACTIVE')
INNER JOIN applicance d
ON (t.applicance_id = d.applicance_id)
INNER JOIN house house
ON (house.house_id = t.house_id)
LEFT JOIN the_rule tr
ON (tr.the_rule_id = t.the_rule_id)
WHERE actionhistory_id    >= 'ACT100010000' and  actionhistory_id  <= 'ACT100030000'
ORDER BY actionhistory_id
)

All of the _id columns are indexed sequences. The first query's explain plan had a cost of 372 and the second was 14. This is running on an Oracle 11g database.

Additionally, if actionhistory_id in the where clause is anything less than ACT100000000, the original query returns instantly.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is because of the index on the actionhistory_id column.

During the first query Oracle has to return all the index blocks containing indexes for records that come after 'ACT100010000', then it has to match the index to the table to get all the records, and then it pulls 29999 records from the result set.

During the second query Oracle only has to return the index blocks containing records between 'ACT100010000' and 'ACT100030000'. Then it grabs from the table those records that are represented in the index blocks. A lot less work in that step of grabbing the record after having found the index than if you use the first query.

Noticing your last line about if the id is less than ACT100000000 - sounds to me that those records may all be in the same memory block (or in a contiguous set of blocks).

EDIT: Please also consider what is said by Justin - I was talking about actual performance, but he is pointing out that the id being a varchar greatly increases the potential values (as opposed to a number) and that the estimated plan may reflect a greater time than reality because the optimizer doesn't know the full range until execution. To further optimize, taking his point into consideration, you could put a function based index on the id column or you could make it a combination key, with the varchar portion in one column and the numeric portion in another.

share|improve this answer
  • What are the plans for both queries?
  • Are the statistics on your tables up to date?
  • Do the two queries return the same set of rows? It's not obvious that they do but perhaps ACT100030000 is the largest actionhistory_id in the system. It's also a bit confusing because the first query has a predicate on actionhistory_id with a value of TRA100010000 which is very different than the ACT value in the second query. I'm guessing that is a typo?
  • Are you measuring the time required to fetch the first row? Or the time required to fetch the last row? What are those elapsed times?

My guess without that information is that the fact that you appear to be using the wrong data type for your actionhistory_id column is affecting the Oracle optimizer's ability to generate appropriate cardinality estimates which is likely causing the optimizer to underestimate the selectivity of your predicates and to generate poorly performing plans. A human may be able to guess that actionhistory_id is a string that starts with ACT10000 and then has 30,000 sequential numeric values from 00001 to 30000 but the optimizer is not that smart. It sees a 13 character string and isn't able to figure out that the last 10 characters are always going to be numbers so there are only 10 possible values rather than 256 (assuming 8-bit characters) and that the first 8 characters are always going to be the same constant value. If, on the other hand, actionhistory_id was defined as a NUMBER and had values between 1 and 30000, it would be dramatically easier for the optimizer to make reasonable estimates about the selectivity of various predicates.

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