Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For this exercise I'm making I want a decimal < 4096 to be written in binary form in an int array.

So for example, 4 would be {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0}. I need this for (nearly) all integers up to 4096, so I've written this piece of code:

for(int k=0; k<4096; k++){
    int[] myNumber =  { (k / 2048) % 2, (k / 1024) % 2, (k / 512) % 2, (k / 256) % 2, (k / 128) % 2, (k / 64) % 2, (k / 32) % 2, (k / 16) % 2, (k / 8) % 2, (k / 4) % 2, (k / 2) % 2, (k / 1) % 2 }
    /* Some processing */
}

This looks kind of ugly, so that's why I'm curious to find out if there is a more elegant way of achieving this?

For the interested reader:
I chose for the array approach of storing the binary numbers, because I need to perform some shifting and addition modulo 2. I'm using an LFSR, and this is my implementation for that:

public class LFSR {

    private int[] polynomial;

    public LFSR(int[] polynomial) {
        this.polynomial = polynomial;
    }

    public int[] shiftLeft(int[] input) {
        int[] result = new int[input.length];

        int out = input[0];
        result[input.length - 1] = out;
        for (int i = input.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
            result[i - 1] = (input[i] + polynomial[i - 1] * out) % 2;
        }

        return result;
    }

}

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
2  
Bit operators: vipan.com/htdocs/bitwisehelp.html leepoint.net/notes-java/data/expressions/bitops.html. Maybe you don't even need the int arrays. –  madth3 Mar 22 '12 at 20:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some pseudo code:

While (int i = 0; i < 12; i++) { 
   bitarray[i] = numericalValue & 0x1;
   numericalValue = numericalValue >> 1;
}

So, shifting right by one bit is division by 2, and ANDing with 1 always leaves you only with the lowest bit which is what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't quite right as in the example the highest bit comes first where as your code would put it last. –  nicktalbot Mar 22 '12 at 20:39
    
Ah, the teacher hinted to this indeed, but I didn't realize how easy it can be. Thanks! –  Niek Haarman Mar 22 '12 at 20:39
    
@nickt but that is just a simple addition. This is for the whole exercise a more elegant way. –  Niek Haarman Mar 22 '12 at 20:40
    
@Niek: If this is homework-related, will you please tag it as such? –  StriplingWarrior Mar 22 '12 at 20:45
    
Yes you just need to reverse the order. I did give the correct answer below but my tablet messed up the formatting. :-( –  nicktalbot Mar 22 '12 at 20:49
public int[] toBin (int num)
{
int[] ret = new int[8];
for (int i = 7, p = 0; i>=0; i--, p++)
{
ret[i] = (num/2**p) % 2;
}
return ret;
}
share|improve this answer

One quick suggestion would be to switch to a byte array instead of an int array, simply to save space, as they will only be 'bits'.

With regards to improving the elegance of your solution, it is perhaps easier to use subcomputations:

int[] intToBinaryArray(int dec){

int[] res = int[12]
for(int i =0; i < 12; i++)
    bitarray[i] = numericalValue & 0x1; //grab first bit only
    dec  /= 2;
}

return res;
}
share|improve this answer
String s = Integer.toBinaryString(int value);

Now convert the String to int[]

int[] intArray = new int[s.length()];
for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
intArray[i] = Character.digit(s.charAt(i), 10);
}
share|improve this answer

This is somewhat shorter ;)

    int[] bits = new int[13];
    String bin = Integer.toBinaryString(8192 + value);
    for(int i = 1; i < bin.length(); i++) {
        bits[i-1] = bin.charAt(i)-'0';
    }
share|improve this answer

"Elegance" is in the eye of the beholder, but I'd start by creating a method to avoid repetition and improve clarity:

int[] myNumber =  { getBit(k, 12), getBit(k, 11), ... };

I personally feel this is the "most elegant" way to get a particular bit:

int getBit(int v, int i)
{
    return v >> i & 1;
}

Then you have to decide whether you want to keep repeating yourself with the calls to getBit or whether you'd rather just use a single while or for loop to populate the whole array. You'd think it'd be quicker the way you've got it written, but there's good chance the JIT compiler automatically unrolls your loop for you if you use a loop like Jochen suggests.

Since this particular operation is entirely self contained, you might even want to create a special method for it:

int[] getBits(int v, int num)
{
    int[] arr = new int[num];
    for(int i=0; i<num; i++) {
        arr[i] = getBit(v, num - i - 1);
    }
    return arr;
}

That makes it easier to unit test, and you can reuse it in a variety of situations.

share|improve this answer

You could use the bit shift operator together withbthe bitwise AND operator as follows. Note bitCount - i - 1 is needed to get the high bit first.

    final int bitCount =12; // Increase to support greater than 4095
    int[] number = new int[bitCount];
    for( int i = 0; i < bitCount; i++ )
    {
      number[i] = ( k >>> ( bitCount - i - 1 ) ) & 1;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! :-) The formatting doesn't seem to work on my tablet. –  nicktalbot Mar 22 '12 at 20:52
    
All you needed was an empty line between your paragraph and the code. –  StriplingWarrior Mar 22 '12 at 20:53
    
@StriplingWarrior Thanks I will try that next time. –  nicktalbot Mar 22 '12 at 20:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.