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I'am about to create a project including a database with multi language support, so I decided to use UTF-8 encoding.

But I'am not sure where to define the encoding. Browsing thru the web and especially in this forum I found a number of hints, but I still miss some basics.

There are a number of levels on which a character set can be defined:

  • OS wide
  • MySQL wide: in the MySQL-INI file and in the php.ini file,
  • for a database: in the create statement,
  • for a table: in the create statement,
  • for a column: in the create statement,
  • connection to mysql: with the --default-character-set=UTF8 switch

It's not clear for me what exactly is set with this switch

  • are the text columns of newly created tables affected, or
  • are transformations made while retrieving text data?
  • or something else?
  • is this necessary if default-character-set=UTF8 is used in my.ini, in the existing database, or existing tables?

Q1: I need some clarification here.

In mysql numerous methods exist to set charsets:

  • set character set
  • set character_set_client
  • set character_set_results
  • set character_set_connection
  • set names

Q2: if the database character set, or the table character set is properly defined - do I need the above commands? - are they replacing the startup option above? Or are they used to refine the switch?

More Questions:

  1. If the character set is defined (as utf8) in the MySQL-INI file, is there a need to use one of the above mentioned commands and switches?

  2. If the character set is not defined or or other than utf8 (maybe I cannot control it), is it enough to create a database with utf8 encoding? And omit any character set switch in create and connect statements?

  3. If defining a character set is not possible for the database, is it enough to set it for the table, or do I have to define it for every char/varchar/text field?

I've seen create table statements like this (NetBeans sample project 'TodoList'):

CREATE TABLE `todo` (
    ...
    `title` VARCHAR(255) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL ,
    `description` TEXT CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NULL,
    `comment` TEXT CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NULL,
    `status` ENUM('PENDING', 'DONE', 'VOIDED') CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT 'PENDING',
    ...
) ENGINE = MYISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

Q6: The CHARSET is defined for the table AND for the text fields - isn't that redundant?

Thanks for any clarification.

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1 Answer

Q1 - end your connection script with: mysql_query ("SET NAMES utf8");
Q2 - yes. If you do not use this setting then can be your output depending on settings of hosting (php ini), where default character encoding could be set.
Q3 - no. Default charset for table, fields can have own or most often a narrow specification (language diferences of sorting etc.) is used.

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Hello Jirka, thank you for answering my question. I found out, that is not necessary to set the charset and collation for every level. Once the charset is defined for the database, the tables and fields are created as expected. So I will in my project: 1. create the database with the utf8 charset 2. define the collation for the fields or the tables as needed. 3. use mysql_query("SET NAMES 'utf8'") to ensure that no transformation is made while data is transported from and to the DB 4. use php utf8 string methods That should do it. –  Gisela Mar 23 '12 at 19:03
    
@Gisela: You should accept Jirka's answer, or post your comment as a separate answer. Makes it easier for future readers to find the solution. –  Mike Purcell Apr 6 '12 at 20:49
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