Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen many people use the following code:

Type t = typeof(obj1);
if (t == typeof(int))
    // Some code here

But I know you could also do this:

if (obj1.GetType() == typeof(int))
    // Some code here

Or this:

if (obj1 is int)
    // Some code here

Personally, I feel the last one is the cleanest, but is there something I'm missing? Which one is the best to use, or is it personal preference?

share|improve this question
3  
I would put some brackets around // Some code here –  Dolphin Jun 11 '09 at 19:18
4  
Don't forget as! –  RCIX Oct 7 '09 at 23:52
29  
as isn't really type checking though... –  jasonh Oct 8 '09 at 0:48
1  
as is certainly a form of type-checking, every bit as much as is is! It effectively uses is behind the scenes, and is used all over the place in MSDN in places where it improves code cleanliness versus is. Instead of checking for is first, a call to as establishes a typed variable that's ready for use: If it's null, respond appropriately; otherwise, proceed. Certainly something I've seen and used quite a bit. –  Zaccone Aug 20 at 16:07

10 Answers 10

up vote 469 down vote accepted

All are different.

  • typeof takes a type name (which you specify at compile time).
  • GetType gets the runtime type of an instance.
  • is returns true if an instance is in the inheritance tree.

Example

class Animal { } 
class Dog : Animal { }

void PrintTypes(Animal a) { 
    print(a.GetType() == typeof(Animal)) // false 
    print(a is Animal)                   // true 
    print(a.GetType() == typeof(Dog))    // true
}

Dog spot = new Dog(); 
PrintTypes(spot);

What about typeof(T)? Is it also resolved at compile time?

Yes. T is always what the type of the expression is. Remember, a generic method is basically a whole bunch of methods with the appropriate type. Example:

string Foo<T>(T object) { return typeof(T).Name; }

Animal probably_a_dog = new Dog();
Dog    definitely_a_dog = new Dog();

Foo(probably_a_dog); // this calls Foo<Animal> and returns "Animal"
Foo<Animal>(probably_a_dog); // this is exactly the same as above
Foo<Dog>(probably_a_dog); // !!! This will not compile. The parameter expects a Dog, you cannot pass in an Animal.

Foo(definitely_a_dog); // this calls Foo<Dog> and returns "Dog"
Foo<Dog>(definitely_a_dog); // this is exactly the same as above.
Foo<Animal>(definitely_a_dog); // this calls Foo<Animal> and returns "Animal". 
Foo((Animal)definitely_a_dog); // this does the same as above, returns "Animal"
share|improve this answer
5  
Ah, so if I have a Ford class that derives from Car and an instance of Ford, checking "is Car" on that instance will be true. Makes sense! –  jasonh Jun 11 '09 at 19:19
    
To clarify, I was aware of that, but I commented before you added a code sample. I wanted to try to add some plain English clarity to your already excellent answer. –  jasonh Jun 11 '09 at 19:25
1  
What about typeof(T)? it also resolved at compile time? –  devi Jan 20 '12 at 12:46
    
@Jimmy So what about performance? typeof vs. GetType()? –  Shimmy Jan 26 '12 at 4:59
4  
@Shimmy if typeof is evaluated at compile time and GetType() is evaluated at runtime, then it makes sense that GetType() incurs a slight performance hit –  Cedric Mamo Dec 10 '12 at 13:35

Use typeof when you want to get the type at compilation time. Use GetType when you want to get the type at execution time. There are rarely any cases to use is as it does a cast and, in most cases, you end up casting the variable anyway.

There is a fourth option that you haven't considered (especially if you are going to cast an object to the type you find as well); that is to use as.

Foo foo = obj as Foo;

if (foo != null)
    // your code here

This only uses one cast whereas this approach:

if (obj is Foo)
    Foo foo = (Foo)obj;

requires two.

share|improve this answer
4  
Thanks for the added options on casting! –  jasonh Jun 11 '09 at 19:27
3  
+1 for as, a great operator. –  Neil Williams Jun 11 '09 at 19:33
1  
With the changes in .NET 4 does is still perform a cast? –  ahsteele Mar 21 '13 at 21:04
1  
Is this answer correct? Is it true that you really can pass an instance into typeof()? My experience has been No. But I guess it's generally true that checking an instance might have to happen at runtime, whereas checking a class should be doable at compile time. –  J Coombs Oct 8 '13 at 2:13

1.

Type t = typeof(obj1);
if (t == typeof(int))

This is illegal, because typeof only works on types, not on variables. I assume obj1 is a variable. So, in this way typeof is static, and does its work at compile time instead of runtime.

2.

if (obj1.GetType() == typeof(int))

This is true if obj1 is exactly of type int. If obj1 derives from int, the if condition will be false.

3.

if (obj1 is int)

This is true if obj1 is an int, or if it derives from a class called int, or if it implements an interface called int.

share|improve this answer
    
Thinking about 1, you're right. And yet, I've seen it in several code samples here. It should be Type t = obj1.GetType(); –  jasonh Jun 11 '09 at 19:26
1  
Yep, I think so. "typeof(obj1)" doesn't compile when I try it. –  Scott Langham Jun 11 '09 at 19:39
Type t = typeof(obj1);
if (t == typeof(int))
    // Some code here

This is an error. The typeof operator in C# can only take type names, not objects.

if (obj1.GetType() == typeof(int))
    // Some code here

This will work, but maybe not as you would expect. For value types, as you've shown here, it's acceptable, but for reference types, it would only return true if the type was the exact same type, not something else in the inheritance hierarchy. For instance:

class Animal{}
class Dog : Animal{}

static void Foo(){
    object o = new Dog();

    if(o.GetType() == typeof(Animal))
        Console.WriteLine("o is an animal");
    Console.WriteLine("o is something else");
}

This would print "o is something else", because the type of o is Dog, not Animal. You can make this work, however, if you use the IsAssignableFrom method of the Type class.

if(typeof(Animal).IsAssignableFrom(o.GetType())) // note use of tested type
    Console.WriteLine("o is an animal");

This technique still leaves a major problem, though. If your variable is null, the call to GetType() will throw a NullReferenceException. So to make it work correctly, you'd do:

if(o != null && typeof(Animal).IsAssignableFrom(o.GetType()))
    Console.WriteLine("o is an animal");

With this, you have equivalent behavior of the is keyword. Hence, if this is the behavior you want, you should use the is keyword, which is more readable and more efficient.

if(o is Animal)
    Console.WriteLine("o is an animal");

What may be still better, though, is to use the as keyword, if you need to do more than just check that something is of a certain type, but to also use that object as that type.

For instance, don't do this:

if(o is Animal)
    ((Animal)o).Speak();

Instead, do this:

Animal a = o as Animal;
if(a != null)
    a.Speak();
share|improve this answer

I believe the last one also looks at inheritance (e.g. Dog is Animal == true), which is better in most cases.

share|improve this answer

I prefer is

That said, if you're using is, you're likely not using inheritance properly.

Assume that Person : Entity, and that Animal : Entity. Feed is a virtual method in Entity (to make Neil happy)

class Person
{
  // A Person should be able to Feed
  // another Entity, but they way he feeds
  // each is different
  public override void Feed( Entity e )
  {
    if( e is Person )
    {
      // feed me
    }
    else if( e is Animal )
    {
      // ruff
    }
  }
}

Rather

class Person
{
  public override void Feed( Person p )
  {
    // feed the person
  }
  public override void Feed( Animal a )
  {
    // feed the animal
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
True, I would never do the former, knowing that Person derives from Animal. –  jasonh Jun 11 '09 at 19:22
1  
The latter isn't really using inheritance, either. Foo should be a virtual method of Entity that is overridden in Person and Animal. –  Neil Williams Jun 11 '09 at 19:31
    
Yes but, this is just an example –  bobobobo Jun 11 '09 at 19:35
    
@Neil, modified a bit, should be a bit clearer what I meant –  bobobobo Jun 11 '09 at 19:40
    
@bobobobo I think you mean "overloading", not "inheritance". –  lc. Jun 11 '09 at 19:42

It depends on what I'm doing. If I need a bool value (say, to determine if I'll cast to an int), I'll use is. If I actually need the type for some reason (say, to pass to some other method) I'll use GetType().

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry! I accidentally edited the wrong answer! –  Andrew Hare Jun 11 '09 at 19:20
    
Good point. I forgot to mention that I got to this question after looking at several answers that used an if statement to check a type. –  jasonh Jun 11 '09 at 19:20

I had a Type-property to compare to and could not use is (like my_type is _BaseTypetoLookFor), but I could use these:

base_type.IsInstanceOfType(derived_object);
base_type.IsAssignableFrom(derived_type);
derived_type.IsSubClassOf(base_type);

Notice that IsInstanceOfType and IsAssignableFrom return true when comparing the same types, where IsSubClassOf will return false. And IsSubclassOf does not work on interfaces, where the other two do. (See also this question and answer.)

class Dog : Animal{}
Animal dog = new Dog();

Animal.IsInstanceOfType(dog);  // true
Dog.IsInstanceOfType(dog);     // true

Animal.IsAssignableFrom(dog.GetType());  // true
Dog.IsAssignableFrom(dog.GetType());     // true

dog.GetType().(IsSubClassOf(Animal));  // true
dog.GetType().(IsSubClassOf(Dog));     // false
share|improve this answer

The last one is cleaner, more obvious, and also checks for subtypes. The others do not check for polymorphism.

share|improve this answer

You can use "typeof()" operator in C# but you need to call the namespace using System.IO; You must use "is" keyword if you wish to check for a type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.