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I think this may be impossible without a complete architecture change but I have classes(plugins) that expose configurable options for the user at runtime.

The program starts, the user can select to use various plugins, the user is confronted with options that they can modify for each plugin, the user presses a play button, these config options are read and off we go.

When the user selects what plugins they want to use an instance of that class is created so it can display the available options for that plugin. Obviously in normal circumstances when classes are instantiated constructor arguments are passed in. In this scenario if a plugin has a constructor argument of ILogger and whose concrete class has a constructor argument of DirectoryPath but this is only readable once the user clicks play how can I get my IOC container to pass that in?

public class MyPlugin
{ 
  private ILogger Logger;
  private Dictionary<string, object> Properties = new Dictionary<string, object>();

  public MyPlugin(ILogger Logger)
  {
     this.Logger = Logger;
     SetupProperties();
  }

  private SetupProperties()
  {
    Properties.Add("LogDirectory","Please enter a directory");
  }

  private void UserPressedPlay()
  {
     //We can now read the property values user has entered
     //Now I want to instantiate FileLogger with the LogDirectory property
  }

  public DoSomething(string Data)
  {
    this.Logger.Write(Data);
  }
}

public interface ILogger
{
  void Write(string Data);
}

public FileLogger : ILogger
{
  private string DirectoryPath;

  public FileLogger(string Directory)
  {
    this.DirectoryPath = Directory;
  }

  public Write(string Data)
  { 
      //Write to file
  }
}
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3  
I don't currently use IOC containers, so I won't post this as an answer, but I think what you want to do is pass in an ILogger factory rather than an actual ILogger. The factory can then be called from UsrePressedPlay with the user's arguments to create the actual Logger instance. –  500 - Internal Server Error Mar 22 '12 at 21:01
    
Without changing the current architecture, I'd go for setting up the default constructor settings in IoC - setting directory to AppData\Local\Temp folder and then reinitializing Logger interface after user clicked play. Though this is rather nasty thing to do and passing logger factory mention by 500 - Internal Server Error is a great idea. –  Dmitriy Reznik Mar 22 '12 at 21:14
    
@500-InternalServerError So you're advocating not using an IOC for this scenario? –  Jon Mar 22 '12 at 21:18
    
Well, no, but you'll be injecting a factory rather than the concrete ILogger implementation. –  500 - Internal Server Error Mar 22 '12 at 22:36
    
Wouldn't the factory be the one that instantiated the class though? –  Jon Mar 23 '12 at 7:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you want to do is pass in an ILogger factory rather than an actual ILogger. The factory can then be called from UserPressedPlay with the user's arguments to create the actual Logger instance.

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You could add a DirectoryPath property to your FileLogger and intitialize it later.

public FileLogger : ILogger
{
    public string DirectoryPath { get; set; }

    public Write(string Data)
    {
        if (DirectoryPath != null) {
            // Write to file
        }
    } 
}
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So do't use IOC to instantiate classes? –  Jon Mar 22 '12 at 21:44
    
Some IOC containers like allow you to define additional rules or code that has to be run after instantiation. Or expose the logger in your Plug-in through a read-only property. I any case you need a reference to the logger in order to be able set the directory path. If you can do that with IOC, ok. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Mar 22 '12 at 22:08
    
How would a read only property work? –  Jon Mar 22 '12 at 22:09
    
Declare the logger as public ILogger Logger { get; private set; } instead of using a variable. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Mar 22 '12 at 22:12

You could use Expression.New to dynamically create / invoke your constructor with the said parameter.

    Func<String, FileLogger> func = GetConsturctor<String, FileLogger>(); // Cache it somewhere.

    FileLogger logger = func(@"C:\Loggerpath\"); // instantiate

   static Func<TArg, TRes> GetConsturctor<TArg, TRes>()
    {
        Type resultType = typeof(TRes);
        Type argType = typeof(TArg);

        Type[] argumentArray = new Type[] { argType };
        ConstructorInfo constructor = resultType.GetConstructor(argumentArray);

        ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(argType);
        Expression<Func<TArg, TRes>> result = Expression.Lambda<Func<TArg, TRes>>(
        Expression.New(constructor, param), param);
        return result.Compile();
    }
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So DI provides a lot of flexibility and lower coupling, but it's often not necessary. For this particular case, worrying about how to add it may be overkill. It appears you've got a GUI here that is configured to match the FileLogger class that you're using to configure it, so maybe DI here is overkill. Do you have any other types of ILogger that your plugin uses today? If so, the factory option would potentially be a good one. I suspect though, based on the mention of the GUI, that there is only one type of logger. In that case, don't get hung up on using DI here. If you're trying to figure out how to test the MyPlugin class, and aren't sure how to do so without DI, then let me know and I'll expand this answer to show how to get it done.

Hope that helps!

Brandon

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