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Basically I need to make a global variable in C that is an array. The Array will be [n][22][n+1] where n is either 3,4,5 or 6 and is selected by the user.

Is there a way to do this or should I just make the array [6][22][7], and have the functions dealing with it only use the parts up to n (if that makes any sense)?

I've had to do this before for a computer science class but can't remember exactly how to do it.

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3 Answers 3

For an array that small (well, assuming reasonably sized data types), you might just be better off making the [6][22][7] allocation you mention in your question - it's not like you're going to waste that much space. Unfortunately for you, C99 variable length arrays don't work for global arrays. That means your only other option is dynamic allocation using malloc()/free().

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i would like to add that if you use array of pointer to your type the space required by 6*22*7 *sizeof pointer is really small so that memory allocation is not an issue ... if i was you i would allocate full array ...following the kiss rule .. keep it simple –  Luca Rocchi Mar 22 '12 at 21:17
    
it's an array of ints, so memory should not be too much of a problem. –  Robert Z Mar 22 '12 at 21:20

You can use a file scope pointer that points to the first element of an array you dynamically allocate (malloc function) in a function.

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As was mentioned previously, in this particular case, doing anything else than a static assignment of [6][22][7] would be a waste of time. If you really want to dynamically allocate the array using malloc :

/*  Suppose that you want a [5][22][6] */

int main() {
    int i,j,k;
    int ***boo;
    int d_1,d_2,d_3;

    d_1=5;
    d_2=22;
    d_3=6;

/*
  +------------------------------------------+
  |  For each dimension, a malloc is needed  |
  +------------------------------------------+
*/
    boo = malloc(d_1*sizeof(int*));
    for (i=0;i<d_1;i++) {
            boo[i] = malloc(d_2*sizeof(int*));
            for (j=0;j<d_2;j++) {
                    boo[i][j] = malloc(d_3*sizeof(int*));
                    for (k=0;k<d_3;k++) {
                            boo[i][j][k] = i+j*k;
                    }

            }
    }

/*
  +----------------------+
  |  Testing the values  |
  +----------------------+
*/
    for (i=0;i<d_1;i++) {
            for (j=0;j<d_2;j++) {
                    for (k=0;k<d_3;k++) {
                            printf("%d ",boo[i][j][k]);
                    }
                    printf("\n");
             }
     }


    return 0;
}

This would essentially do the trick. It might be useful, if you have a greater amount of data.

Don't forget to deallocate the memory using free()

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