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Given the following XML:

<root>
    Pacman <format bold="1" italic="1">rules</format>!
</root>

What is a better implementation than the following, which results in 2n-1 possible conditional statements?

<xsl:template match="format">
    <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="@bold='1' and @italic='1'">
            <b><i><xsl:value-of-select="."/></i></b>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:when test="@bold='1'">
            <b><xsl:value-of-select="."/></b>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:when test="@italic='1'">
            <i><xsl:value-of-select="."/></i>
        </xsl:when>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

You can see there is a huge problem if I want to add a new possible attribute such as underline="1", which will result in 4 new conditionals here.

Edit: Also assume that I cannot use CSS classes and must use HTML tags for styling.

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1  
2^n if you count the case that none of the attributes is set. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 22 '12 at 21:38
    
Yes, you are technically correct. (The best kind of correct. :) –  Matt Huggins Mar 22 '12 at 21:39
    
Of course, there is a simple way, even in XSLT 1.0, to express the required processing -- even without any xsl:choose or any xsl:apply-imports. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 23 '12 at 3:00
    
@MattHuggins: Right now you have accepted a wrong answer -- which of the templates is going to generate the innermost text? –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 23 '12 at 14:32
1  
@Dimitre Novatchev - The last one in the chain. –  Matt Huggins Mar 23 '12 at 23:22
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My XSLT is so rusty, the hinges won't budge, but I think you can use <xsl:call-template … /> to process one attribute at a time using one template per attribute.

The following probably has some very obvious mistakes, but hopefully it gives you the vibe.

<xsl:template name="bold">
    <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="@bold='1'">
            <b><xsl:call-template name="italics" /></b>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:call-template name="italics" />
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="italics">
    …
</xsl:template>
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Hmm. This doesn't feel right. What happens if I add an underline="1" attribute that needs to be handled too? Then I'll need to branch off both current templates to determine if they've been exclusively combined with one another. –  Matt Huggins Mar 22 '12 at 21:53
    
@MattHuggins: Chain them — bold call italics, which calls underline. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 22 '12 at 23:16
    
Shortly after writing my original comment, it clicked. Totally makes sense. Will give it a shot and mark as correct if it works. :) Thanks! –  Matt Huggins Mar 23 '12 at 0:44
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I'll start with an XSLT 2.0 solution and then tell you how to convert it to XSLT 1.0.

<xsl:template match="format[@italic='1']" priority="10">
  <i><xsl:next-match/></i>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="format[@bold='1']" priority="9">
  <b><xsl:next-match/></b>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="format[@underline='1']" priority="8">
  <u><xsl:next-match/></u>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="format" priority="7">
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl:template>

Now, xsl:next-match requires XSLT 2.0, but 1.0 has xsl:apply-imports, which does almost the same job, except that the four template rules now need to be in separate modules, each one importing the next. Not handy, but that's why people prefer 2.0.

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The templates can be chained in a way where each one is invoked exactly once at run-time, and exactly twice in XSLT.

<xsl:template name="bold">
    <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="@bold='1'">
            <b><xsl:call-template name="italics" /></b>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:call-template name="italics" />
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="italics">
        <xsl:when test="@italics='1'">
            <i><xsl:call-template name="underscore" /></i>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:call-template name="underscore" />
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="underscore">
        <xsl:when test="@underscore='1'">
            ...
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            ...
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>
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1  
Minor point, but there's no xsl:else in XSLT, I think you mean xsl:otherwise. –  Flynn1179 Mar 24 '12 at 11:56
    
@Flynn1179 - Thank you, now fixed. –  Jirka Hanika Mar 24 '12 at 17:24
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The currently accepted solution produces the wanted attributes in a fixed, hardcoded order, that doesn't correspond to the order of the attributes of the format element contained in the source XML document.

Such a solution may be acceptable in the case of HTML, but there could be other cases, where preservation of the order of attributes is desirable.

This answer presents a solution that preserves the order of the attributes. Also, the names of the attributes are not hardcoded into the code (can be contained into a separate document), which makes the code absolutely independent of any changes to the names of the source attributes or the corresponding names of elements to be generated.

Here is a simple XSLT 1.0 solution that occupies a single xslt stylesheet and doesn't use <xsl:apply-imports>.

This solution doesn't rely on or know about the order of attributes or their number, and works correctly if this order or number of attributes is changed in any way:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:my="my:my" exclude-result-prefixes="my">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <my:mapping>
   <map old="strikeout">strike</map>
 </my:mapping>

 <xsl:variable name="vMap" select="document('')/*/my:mapping/*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
   <xsl:copy>
     <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
   </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="format">
   <xsl:variable name="vAttribs" select="@*"/>
   <xsl:call-template name="genAttribs">
     <xsl:with-param name="pAttribs" select="$vAttribs"/>
   </xsl:call-template>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="genAttribs">
   <xsl:param name="pAttribs" select="/.."/>

   <xsl:choose>
     <xsl:when test="$pAttribs">
      <xsl:variable name="vMappedElemName"
        select="$vMap[@old = name($pAttribs)]"/>


      <xsl:variable name="vElemName" select=
      "concat($vMappedElemName,
              substring(name($pAttribs[not($vMappedElemName)])
                        ,1,1)
             )
      "/>

        <xsl:element name="{$vElemName}">
            <xsl:call-template name="genAttribs">
              <xsl:with-param name="pAttribs"
                   select="$pAttribs[position() > 1]"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:element>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
      <xsl:value-of select="."/>
    </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<root>
  Pacman
    <format bold="1" italic="1"
    underscore="1"
    strikeout="1">rules</format>!
</root>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<root>
  Pacman
    <b>
      <i>
         <u>
            <strike>rules</strike>
         </u>
      </i>
   </b>!
</root>

Explanation:

  1. The attributes are processed one by one to produce nested elements. Only after the last attribute has been processed, we generate the text node of the parent of the attribute in the body of the generated innermost element

  2. We maintain a mapping table -- a mapping attribute-name --> element-name needs to be specified only if the desired translation of an attribute name to element name isn't just the first letter of the attribute name. If an attribute name is specified in the mapping table, then we use the string value of this element of the mapping table to generate the element name.

  3. If the attribute name isn't specified in the mapping table, then for the element name we use the first letter of the attribute name.

Thus, the solution doesn't require any modification if any new attribute is specified and the name of its corresponding (to-be-generated) element is the first letter of this attribute's name.

Finally: Do note that the mapping table doesn't need to be part of the XSLT code (it is here only for convenience) -- in a realworld scenarion this would be a separate XML document (file) and the XSLT code will nevere have to be updated when a new attribute-name --> element-name mapping needs to be added.

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Dimitre - I like this proposed solution. However, when I try to transform in XML Spy, it hangs for a minute before crashing, and when I try to render on my app, it doesn't work. (I believe there is a silent error that I don't have access to and will have to look into.) I do like this proposal though, and will give you a +1 for now. I would like to change the chaining implementation that someone else suggested to use yours instead. –  Matt Huggins Mar 23 '12 at 13:51
    
@DimitreNovatchev please explain why Marcelo Cantos's answer is wrong –  Tom Howard Mar 26 '12 at 11:11
    
@TomHoward: This is very easy to do: 1. No complete/real solution is provided. No copying of the string value of the element is provided -- just elipses. 2. This "solution" would only work if the order of attributes is fixed and known in advance. Even in this case this "solution" might not work, because in the XPath Data Model atributes have no order -- their order is implementation-dependent and may vary from implementation to implementation. To put it shortly, it isn't guaranteed that the attributes would arrive in the order we see them. My solution doesn't depend on the order of attributes. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 26 '12 at 13:07
    
@MattHuggins: Please, have a look at the updated solution -- with added a second example where a new attribute is added and the same code, without any modifications works with the new XML document and produces the wanted result. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 26 '12 at 13:50
1  
@DimitreNovatchev - I did have to change your code to make it work for me. Since I also needed it to work for <strikeout> nodes (i.e. <stike> HTML tags needed to be generated), I couldn't use your substring method for creating elements. Instead, I creating another template that I called, which returned the name of the element based upon the current attribute name. That may be why I ran into an issue where XML Spy crashed. With regards to Marcelo Cantos' answer, it didn't depend on the order of attributes in the XML, and I implemented it successfully. –  Matt Huggins Mar 26 '12 at 14:15
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