Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Following the pattern recommended in this question, where we have something akin to:

function foo(a, b, opts) {

}

foo(1, 2, {"method":"add"});
foo(3, 4, {"test":"equals", "bar":"tree"});

How would one then include a callback as the final parameter? I have function foo() that should be able to handle both of:

foo(x, y, function() {
  // do stuff
});

And

foo(x, y, z, function() {
  // do stuff
});

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe I'm misreading or misunderstanding but are you asking if you can put a function within an object? –  ElatedOwl Mar 22 '12 at 21:47
    
That would work too, but can't find if that is possible –  Paul Mennega Mar 23 '12 at 17:01
1  
It is indeed possible. {"oscar" : function () { console.log("I live in a trashcan.") }} So, assuming you named your object foo, foo.oscar would run the function. –  ElatedOwl Mar 26 '12 at 13:19
add comment

4 Answers 4

So basically you want to accept a variable number of arguments, followed by a callback as the last one? Something similar to how PHP's array_udiff works?

This is fairly simple:

function foo() {
    var args = [], l = arguments.length, i;
    for( i=0; i<l; i++) args[i] = arguments[i];

    var callback = args.pop();
    // now you have your variable number of arguments as an array `args`
    // and your callback that was the last parameter.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why exactly would you create an exact copy of arguments array by for loop and then pop the callback, instead of just using arguments? –  joncys Mar 22 '12 at 21:55
1  
Because arguments is an array-like object, not an actual array. –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 22 '12 at 22:01
    
You could just use var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments) –  evan.bovie Dec 11 '13 at 1:49
    
@evan.bovie Could, but not allowed in older browsers ;) –  Niet the Dark Absol Dec 11 '13 at 12:11
    
@NiettheDarkAbsol and that's when we drop support or use a shim. –  evan.bovie Dec 16 '13 at 13:55
show 1 more comment

I'd say just use the arguments object:

function foo(a, b) {
    // Do stuff


    // Done stuff


    var alength = arguments.length;

    // If more than 2 arguments and last argument is a function
    if(alength > 2 && typeof arguments[alength - 1] === 'function')
        arguments[alength - 1].call(this);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
but why do you use window.arguments instead of the local arguments variable? –  Bergi Mar 22 '12 at 21:58
1  
@Bergi I... I have no idea why I did that lol. –  Paulpro Mar 22 '12 at 22:05
add comment

You could do similar to .apply. (unlike .call)

function foo(args, cb) {}

foo(['a', 'b', 'c'], function() {} );

And if you need to, you could put them into variables using .shift:

function foo(args, cb) {
    var a = args.shift(),
        b = args.shift();
    // and so on...
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ended up going with the following solution:

foo(args) {}

foo({"x":"add", "callback": function() {
  // do stuff
}});


foo({"x":"equals", "y":"tree", "callback": function() {
  // do stuff
}});

And then simply checking to see if the last arguments value is a function, ala @PaulP.R.O.'s solution above:

if((arguments.length > 1) && (typeof arguments[arguments.length - 1] === 'function')) {
  var callback = arguments[arguments.length - 1];
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.