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I am having trouble trying to make a HashMap accessible to other methods in the class that it's in.

Here is basically what I am trying to do,

class object
    method main
        this.test=9
    method fire
        output this.test

Here is the real code

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.String;
import java.util.HashMap;

public class problem {
    public HashMap dict;

    public problem() {
        HashMap<String, String[]> dict = new HashMap<String, String[]>();

        // put everything into hashmap
        String[] items = { "toys", "sun" };
        dict.put("animal", items);
        String[] items_2 = { "fun", "games" };
        view.put("human", items_2);

        this.view = view;

        // start
        this.BeginM();
    }

    public void BeginM() {
        System.out.println(this.view.get("human")[0]); // should give "fun"
    }
}

I get this error at the output stage:

array required, but java.lang.Object found
share|improve this question
    
Does this, um, compile? –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 22:22
    
Interesting coincidence - you left out the line of code that is causing the problem. –  Java42 Mar 22 '12 at 22:24
    
Chuck, he didn't leave anything out. However, it's correct that the above won't compile. –  CollinJSimpson Mar 22 '12 at 22:26
    
I'm loving the stream of edits that somehow make this question less readable. –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You know what? I've had one of those days where no matter how hard you try nothing quite ends up working right so, in order to have something actually working right, I'm going to fix up your code!

I sometimes see people post total rewrites of strange questions here and I've always wondered why!? Now I know, it's to compensate for having a day where one of your virtual machines goes belly up for no reason, you've got a bug that eludes reproduction until the moment you look away and your dog forgot his housetraining spontaneously.

Anyway, you need to figure out whether you want that variable to be called dict or view. Pick one, but you'll need to stick with it. I don't really care, but I'm using dict here. If you prefer the other, hey, it's your code, do what you like! But don't use both, that'll get confusing.

Your problem is that in your field, you're just using HashMap. Use the fancy well-typed stuff, or cast. Otherwise, HashMap just holds Objects. And an Object isn't a String[]. So you either need to cast the results of get() to a String[], or you can just forget about all that and use the fancy well-typed stuff (sometimes we call that "generics"). I'm going to use the fancy well-typed stuff (HashMap<String, String[]>), but like I said - it's your code, cast if you want to!

Anyway, that gets us to:

public class problem
{
    HashMap<String, String[]> dict;

    public problem()
    {
        HashMap<String, String[]> dict = new HashMap<String, String[]>();

        // put everything into hashmap
        String[] items =
        {
            "toys", "sun"
        };
        dict.put("animal", items);
        String[] items_2 =
        {
            "fun", "games"
        };
        dict.put("human", items_2);

        this.dict = dict;

        // start
        this.BeginM();
    }

    public void BeginM()
    {
        System.out.println(this.dict.get("human")[0]); // should give "fun"
    }
}

See my line 3? By declaring that field dict as a HashMap<String, String[]>, now BeginM() knows what kind of objects it holds and you won't get that error any more.

Although I'd take it a step further and make it a bit more concise and a bit less error prone:

public class Problem
{
    private final HashMap<String, String[]> dict;

    public void Problem()
    {
        dict = new HashMap<String, String[]>();

        dict.put("animal", new String[] { "toys, "sun" });
        dict.put("human", new String[] { "fun", "games" });

        BeginM();
    }

    public void BeginM()
    {
        System.out.println(dict.get("human")[0]);
    }
}

So what did I do there? Well, first I capitalized Problem. It's sort of convention to have class names that start with a capital letter. Not mandatory, of course, but it's nice to have, especially when you're working with other developers. Case in point: I thought your constructor for problem was a method that lacked a return value! Also, I made dict final and private, this is so that you don't accidentally overwrite that field later. And I made it private, which is good design. If somebody else needs to get at it, we can give them an accessor method. Finally, I got rid of this., because I don't really like it - but, hey, still your code, put it back if you want!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 since you had a hard day, and this is a decent answer to a poorly formed question. –  Paul Wagland Mar 22 '12 at 23:02
    
wow, awesome, i'm happy that i got an well explained answer, thanks! –  user1277330 Mar 22 '12 at 23:02
    
@user1277330: welcome to stackoverflow! –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 23:38
    
@PaulWagland: thanks! My initial comment was so remarkably unhelpful that I decided I should probably repent and write a proper answer. –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 23:39
    
Thanks for the good laugh! –  assylias Mar 23 '12 at 0:44

I believe this.view.get("human") returns a String, not an array. You need to use this.view.get("human").charAt(0) instead of this.view.get("human")[0], since Java Strings can't be indexed like arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this.view.get("human") could return anything, since this.view isn't defined anywhere. But I think the intention (although, I admit, it's hard to tell) is to have a HashMap<String, String[]>, which would mean that yes, view.get("human") would return an array. –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 22:26
    
view is implied to be a HashMap because of the way he accesses it. get() is defined in the Map class. –  CollinJSimpson Mar 22 '12 at 22:30
    
I don't think the compiler will spontaneously create a variable because of an implication. And if it does, then I need to start using that one. –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 22:33
    
I wasn't saying that his code would compile. I was just saying that we can deduce the variable datatype. I was focusing more on describing the syntax error and not his messy structure. –  CollinJSimpson Mar 22 '12 at 22:40
1  
I see. I agree that we can deduce it and I suggest that the author intends HashMap<String, String[]>, which would make get("human")[0] perfectly legal. –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 22:41

Change: (BTW, missing from your example)

Map view = new HashMap<String,String[])

to;

Map<String,String[]> view = new HashMap<String,String[])
share|improve this answer
1  
have you tried to compile the code he has posted? –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 22 '12 at 22:33
1  
Missing the types on the Map will just bring up some warnings in the code, not errors. His problem is about the name of the variables, and the main function, which he hasn't posted. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 22 '12 at 22:41
1  
@LuiggiMendoza - Not corret. For his usage, map.get("x")[0], the missing generics cause a compile error "The type of the expression must be an array type but it resolved to Object". Try it. –  Java42 Mar 22 '12 at 22:44
1  
@ChuckFricano is obviously correct here. The non-generic HashMap is equivalent to HashMap<Object, Object> and thus would require a cast. –  Edward Thomson Mar 22 '12 at 22:49
1  
@LuiggiMendoza - My solution is correct. There are likely others. In this case, the missing generics cause an error, not a warning and properly using generics correct the problem. Casting is unsafe. That is why generics were added to Java. –  Java42 Mar 22 '12 at 22:55

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