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Here is a way to solve Euler problem 43 (please let me know if this doesn't give the correct answer). Is there a monad or some other syntatic sugar which could assist with keeping track of the notElem conditions?

toNum xs = foldl (\s d -> s*10+d) 0 xs

numTest xs m = (toNum xs) `mod` m == 0

pandigitals = [ [d0,d1,d2,d3,d4,d5,d6,d7,d8,d9] |
                d7 <- [0..9],
                d8 <- [0..9], d8 `notElem` [d7],
                d9 <- [0..9], d9 `notElem` [d8,d7],
                numTest [d7,d8,d9] 17,
                d5 <- [0,5],  d5 `notElem` [d9,d8,d7],
                d3 <- [0,2,4,6,8], d3 `notElem` [d5,d9,d8,d7],
                d6 <- [0..9], d6 `notElem` [d3,d5,d9,d8,d7],
                numTest [d6,d7,d8] 13,
                numTest [d5,d6,d7] 11,
                d4 <- [0..9], d4 `notElem` [d6,d3,d5,d9,d8,d7],
                numTest [d4,d5,d6] 7,
                d2 <- [0..9], d2 `notElem` [d4,d6,d3,d5,d9,d8,d7],
                numTest [d2,d3,d4] 3,
                d1 <- [0..9], d1 `notElem` [d2,d4,d6,d3,d5,d9,d8,d7],
                d0 <- [1..9], d0 `notElem` [d1,d2,d4,d6,d3,d5,d9,d8,d7]
              ]

main = do
         let nums = map toNum pandigitals
         print $ nums
         putStrLn ""
         print $ sum nums

For instance, in this case the assignment to d3 is not optimal - it really should be moved to just before the numTest [d2,d3,d4] 3 test. Doing that, however, would mean changing some of the notElem tests to remove d3 from the list being checked. Since the successive notElem lists are obtained by just consing the last chosen value to the previous list, it seems like this should be doable - somehow.

UPDATE: Here is the above program re-written with Louis' UniqueSel monad below:

toNum xs = foldl (\s d -> s*10+d) 0 xs
numTest xs m = (toNum xs) `mod` m == 0

pandigitalUS =
  do d7 <- choose
     d8 <- choose
     d9 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d7,d8,d9] 17
     d6 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d6,d7,d8] 13
     d5 <- choose
     guard $ d5 == 0 || d5 == 5
     guard $ numTest [d5,d6,d7] 11
     d4 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d4,d5,d6] 7
     d3 <- choose
     d2 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d2,d3,d4] 3
     d1 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d1,d2,d3] 2
     d0 <- choose
     guard $ d0 /= 0
     return [d0,d1,d2,d3,d4,d5,d6,d7,d8,d9]

pandigitals = map snd $ runUS pandigitalUS [0..9]

main = do print $ pandigitals
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Sure.

newtype UniqueSel a = UniqueSel {runUS :: [Int] -> [([Int], a)]}
instance Monad UniqueSel where
  return a = UniqueSel (\ choices -> [(choices, a)])
  m >>= k = UniqueSel (\ choices -> 
    concatMap (\ (choices', a) -> runUS (k a) choices')
      (runUS m choices))

instance MonadPlus UniqueSel where
  mzero = UniqueSel $ \ _ -> []
  UniqueSel m `mplus` UniqueSel k = UniqueSel $ \ choices ->
    m choices ++ k choices

-- choose something that hasn't been chosen before
choose :: UniqueSel Int
choose = UniqueSel $ \ choices ->
  [(pre ++ suc, x) | (pre, x:suc) <- zip (inits choices) (tails choices)]

and then you treat it like the List monad, with guard to enforce choices, except that it won't choose an item more than once. Once you have a UniqueSel [Int] computation, just do map snd (runUS computation [0..9]) to give it [0..9] as the choices to select from.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting a type error: runUS choices is a function [Int] -> [([Int], a0)], but the compiler is expecting just [([Int], a)] –  user5402 Mar 23 '12 at 1:25
    
The (runUS choices) should have been (runUS m choices) –  pat Mar 23 '12 at 4:42
    
Also, is guard from Control.Monad? If so, what would mzero be for UniqueSel? –  user5402 Mar 23 '12 at 8:01
    
Looks like StateT [Int] []. –  luqui Mar 23 '12 at 9:25
    
@luqui, I'm not 100% sure it's the same -- I'm not 100% sure which is StateT [Int] [] and which is ListT (State [Int]). –  Louis Wasserman Mar 23 '12 at 13:46

Before jumping to monads, let's consider guided unique selection from finite domains first: (edit: function names changed to some better ones, I believe 2013-02-14)

pick []     = []       -- same - flipped - as stackoverflow.com/a/12872133
pick (x:xs) = (xs,x) : [ (x:b,a) | (b,a) <- pick xs]

one_of xs ys  = [ (b,a) | x <- xs, Just (b,a) <- [select1 x ys] ]

select1 x []            = Nothing
select1 x (y:ys) | x==y = Just (ys,x)
                 | True = case select1 x ys 
                             of Nothing     -> Nothing 
                                Just (zs,x) -> Just (y:zs,x) 

With this a list comprehension can be written without the use of elem calls:

p43 = sum [ fromDigits [d0,d1,d2,d3,d4,d5,d6,d7,d8,d9]
            | (dom5,d5) <- one_of [0,5] [0..9]
            , (dom6,d6) <- pick dom5          
            , (dom7,d7) <- pick dom6          
            , rem (100*d5+10*d6+d7) 11 == 0 
            ....

fromDigits    :: (Integral a) => [a] -> Integer
fromDigits ds = foldl' (\s d-> s*10 + fromIntegral d) 0 ds

The monad from Louis Wasserman's answer can be further augmented with additional operations based on the functions above.

The following is based on the code from Louis Wasserman's answer above (I don't know what's the appropriate etiquette in such cases, as per inclusion of his code, so I don't):

newtype UniqueSel a = UniqueSel { runUS :: [Int] -> [([Int], a)] }
instance Monad UniqueSel where
  -- as in Louis's answer

instance MonadPlus UniqueSel where
  -- as in Louis's answer

choose             :: UniqueSel Int
choose             = UniqueSel pick
choose_one_of xs   = UniqueSel $ one_of xs
choose_n n         = relicateM n choose
set_choices cs     = UniqueSel (\choices -> [(cs, ())])
get_choices        = UniqueSel (\choices -> [([], choices)])

So that we can write

numTest xs m = fromDigits xs `rem` m == 0

pandigitalUS :: UniqueSel [Int]
pandigitalUS = do
     set_choices [0..9]
     [d7,d8,d9] <- choose_n 3
     guard $ numTest [d7,d8,d9] 17
     d6 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d6,d7,d8] 13
     d5 <- choose_one_of [0,5]
     guard $ numTest [d5,d6,d7] 11
     d4 <- choose
     guard $ numTest [d4,d5,d6] 7
     d3 <- choose_one_of [0,2..8]
     d2 <- choose
     guard $ rem (d2+d3+d4) 3 == 0 
     [d1,d0] <- choose_n 2
     guard $ d0 /= 0
     return [d0,d1,d2,d3,d4,d5,d6,d7,d8,d9]

pandigitals = map (fromDigits.snd) $ runUS pandigitalUS []

main = do print $ sum pandigitals
share|improve this answer
    
if you write fromDigits to have type Num a => [a] -> Integer, you can keep d0, ... d9 as Ints since no overflow will occur in the rem calls. –  user5402 Mar 27 '12 at 22:37
    
thanks for showing the set_choices, choose_one, choose_n and select functions –  user5402 Mar 27 '12 at 22:42
    
@user5402 thanks for the suggestion. :) It worked, with Integral context though. Will edit. –  Will Ness Mar 28 '12 at 8:41

The UniqueSel monad suggested by Louis Wasserman is exactly StateT [Integer] [] (I'm using Integer everywhere for simplicity).

The state keeps the available digits and every computation is nondeterministic - from a given state we can select different digits to continue with. Now the choose function can be implemented as

import Control.Monad
import Control.Monad.State
import Control.Monad.Trans
import Data.List

choose :: PanM Integer
choose = do
    xs <- get
    x <- lift xs -- pick one of `xs`
    let xs' = x `delete` xs
    put xs'
    return x

And then the monad is run by evalStateT as

main = do
         let nums = evalStateT pandigitals [0..9]
         -- ...
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