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I had a code to run computer simulation of membrane. I added some minor modification which caused the weirdest segmentation fault. In my code I have set up a map:

struct index{
  int x;
  int y;
  int z;
  bool operator<(const index &b) const {
    bool out = true;
    if (x == b.x){
      if (y == b.y){  
    out = z < b.z;
  }else out = y < b.y;
    }else out = x < b.x;
    return out;
  }
};
map<index,set<std::pair<int, int> > > tBoxes;

the segmentation fault occur when I do

if (tBoxes.find(t) == tBoxes.end()) continue;

So, when I run the code through valgrind I see that: 1. I have this when I first assign values to the map:

==26196== 6,568 (96 direct, 6,472 indirect) bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 86 of 145
==26196==    at 0x4A0666E: operator new(unsigned long) (vg_replace_malloc.c:220)
==26196==    by 0x4333C6: __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::_Rb_tree_node<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::allocate(unsigned long, void const*) (new_allocator.h:88)
==26196==    by 0x4333EB: std::_Rb_tree<membrane::index, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > >, std::less<membrane::index>, std::allocator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::_M_get_node() (stl_tree.h:358)
==26196==    by 0x433407: std::_Rb_tree<membrane::index, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > >, std::less<membrane::index>, std::allocator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::_M_create_node(std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > const&) (stl_tree.h:367)
==26196==    by 0x434474: std::_Rb_tree<membrane::index, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > >, std::less<membrane::index>, std::allocator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::_M_insert(std::_Rb_tree_node_base*, std::_Rb_tree_node_base*, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > const&) (stl_tree.h:819)
==26196==    by 0x434919: std::_Rb_tree<membrane::index, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > >, std::less<membrane::index>, std::allocator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::insert_unique(std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > >, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > const&) (stl_tree.h:962)
==26196==    by 0x434B52: std::map<membrane::index, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > >, std::less<membrane::index>, std::allocator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::insert(std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > >, std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > const&) (stl_map.h:420)
==26196==    by 0x434C3B: std::map<membrane::index, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > >, std::less<membrane::index>, std::allocator<std::pair<membrane::index const, std::set<std::pair<int, int>, std::less<std::pair<int, int> >, std::allocator<std::pair<int, int> > > > > >::operator[](membrane::index const&) (stl_map.h:348)
  1. at some later stage of the code, there is note that:

Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)

  1. There are, also, other messages by valgrind which I don't focus upon currently. At least some of them are related to these two.

On a line that compares to double values which are declared previously (one is the first value generated in the simulation and the other is the element I wish to check which is determined.

So I have two questions: 1. About the segmentation fault. what is the meaning of this valgrind output? How can it be that setting a map value is invalid.

  1. About the conditional jump error. How can It be? Is it possible that valgrind is interpreting the error position wrong?

Thank you for any help

Edit:
1. t is an index element that is legally defined. I use a loop:

index t;
for (int i = mini; i <= maxi; i++){ //mini and maxi are previously defined
  if (i < 0) t.x = i + P.boxNum; //P.boxNum is an integer, defined when I start the code
  else if (i >= P.boxNum) t.x  = i - P.boxNum;
  else t.x = i;
  for (int j = minj; j <= maxj; j++){//maxj and minj are previously defined
    if (j < 0) t.y = j + P.boxNum;
    else if (j >= P.boxNum) t.y =j - P. boxNum;
    else t.y = j;
    for(int k = mink; k <= maxk; k++){//mink and maxk are previously defined
      if (k < 0) t.z = k + P.zBoxNum;
      else if (k >= P.boxNum) t.z =k - P. zBoxNum;
      else t.z = k;
      if (tBoxes.find(t) == eBoxes.end()) continue;
      //now I access tBoxes[t], this should be ok since if tBoxes[t] does not exist the loop should skip to the next value of k
    }
  }
}
  1. I have found the exact position of the segmentation fault by using:

    printf ("%i, %i, %i\n", t.x, t.y, t.z); fflush(stdout);

both before and after the mentioned line.

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1  
Is it possible to post a small program that reproduces this? How is t declared and populated? –  hmjd Mar 22 '12 at 22:28
    
I wish. The code is too long for me to simplify it I suspect this is a combination of two errors. I'm looking for a way to pin point the events that cause valgrind to print an error –  Yotam Mar 23 '12 at 6:19

2 Answers 2

First thing, the complaint of valgrind about jump on uninitialized value is probably correct. Proper C++ code does not generate this warning. (note, i'm making an assumption here, that you have default exclusions loaded in valgrind, because there can be locations standard library code which are designed to work correctly whether the value has been initialized to something sane or not, maybe a silly assumption considering the quality of the rest of your question) A big faux pas is that you don't have a constructor in your struct which would initialize x, y, z values. Values of basic type allocated on heap remain uninitialized and will contain random memory garbage! However, it's unlikely the reason why you crash.

Second thing, think about it, std::map is a kind of tree. It assumes that from every node, children which are smaller are left, and which are bigger are right. So whenever you change something inside which affects the sorting, e.g. you go into the index and change x, y, or z, so to say you change the key from underneath std::map, without it knowing about it, the node stays in its place, which is suddenly WRONG because it violates basic assumption of the data structure! What you have to do in that case, is to delete the entry and put it back in with a new index, which will land it on the correct spot in the set. This unfortunate kind of thing happened to me a good few times. I still don't know of a REALLY elegant way to do this, but at least, here, possible and likely cause.

Of course the actual bug is not in the code you posted, and it's not even clear where and what and how much you changed, and not having a backtrace to the crash location doesn't help at all.

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Thanks. Sadly, I didn't understand you answer completely. The strange thing about the map is that I never delete a specific from the map. I only clear it completely and generate a new one and I don't think this is what happen in that case. Anyhow, I have reverted back to a working version and taking another go on things. –  Yotam Mar 23 '12 at 9:19
    
Deleting from a map is always OK, nothing (i can think of) can go wrong at that point. I suspect you're writing into value of it->first where it is a tBoxes::iterator. And oh BY THE WAY, what if one index is equal to another, i.e. index1 < index2 and index2 < index1? This is also not allowed, use std::multimap which can handle this case. –  3yE Mar 23 '12 at 9:32
    
I didn't understand you comment about the index and this may be important. As for writing, do you mean I extend the set too much? –  Yotam Mar 23 '12 at 10:29

Never forget about rebuilding.

Very simmilar thing happened to me today. Strange, "random" behaviour, crashes in stl... It showed up it was a build problem - something wasn't rebuilt after header change.

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