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Function one() accepts one parameter pack. Function two() accepts two. Each pack is constrained to be wrapped in types A and B. Why is it impossible to instantiate two()?

template <typename T>
struct A {};

template <typename T>
struct B {};

template <typename... Ts>
void one(A<Ts> ...as) {
}

template <typename... Ts, typename... Us>
void two(A<Ts> ...as, B<Us> ...bs) {
}

int main() {
  auto a = A<int>();
  auto b = B<int>();

  // Just fine
  one();
  one(a);
  one(a, a);

  // All errors    
  two();
  two(a);
  two(a, b);
}

Tried with gcc and clang.

sam@wish:~/x/cpp$ gcc -std=c++0x variadic_templates.cpp 
variadic_templates.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
variadic_templates.cpp:23:7: error: no matching function for call to ‘two()’
variadic_templates.cpp:23:7: note: candidate is:
variadic_templates.cpp:11:6: note: template<class ... Ts, class ... Us> void two(A<Ts>..., B<Us>...)
variadic_templates.cpp:24:8: error: no matching function for call to ‘two(A<int>&)’
variadic_templates.cpp:24:8: note: candidate is:
variadic_templates.cpp:11:6: note: template<class ... Ts, class ... Us> void two(A<Ts>..., B<Us>...)
variadic_templates.cpp:25:11: error: no matching function for call to ‘two(A<int>&, B<int>&)’
variadic_templates.cpp:25:11: note: candidate is:
variadic_templates.cpp:11:6: note: template<class ... Ts, class ... Us> void two(A<Ts>..., B<Us>...)
sam@wish:~/x/cpp$ clang -std=c++0x variadic_templates.cpp 
variadic_templates.cpp:23:3: error: no matching function for call to 'two'
  two();
  ^~~
variadic_templates.cpp:11:6: note: candidate function template not viable: requires at least 1 argument, but 0 were provided                                                                                                                 
void two(A<Ts> ...as, B<Us> ...bs) {}
     ^
variadic_templates.cpp:24:3: error: no matching function for call to 'two'                                                                                                                                                                   
  two(a);
  ^~~
variadic_templates.cpp:11:6: note: candidate function not viable: requires 0 arguments, but 1 was provided                                                                                                                                   
void two(A<Ts> ...as, B<Us> ...bs) {}
     ^
variadic_templates.cpp:25:3: error: no matching function for call to 'two'                                                                                                                                                                   
  two(a, b);
  ^~~
variadic_templates.cpp:11:6: note: candidate function not viable: requires 0 arguments, but 2 were provided                                                                                                                                  
void two(A<Ts> ...as, B<Us> ...bs) {}
     ^
3 errors generated.
share|improve this question
    
A<Ts> ...as -- is this even legal as a parameter? – Xeo Mar 22 '12 at 22:31
2  
How would the compiler know when one pack ends and the other begins? – ildjarn Mar 22 '12 at 22:32
    
@Xeo: It's legal AFAIK. Two compilers accept it. – Samuel Danielson Mar 22 '12 at 22:33
1  
@ildjarn: Because one pack must have types wrapped in A while the other must have types wrapped in B. – Samuel Danielson Mar 22 '12 at 22:34
2  
The committee considers (or at least did so, not sure about the current state) changing the rules regarding this so currently compiler implementations differ in the handling of them. For example, clang rejects a call to a template<class ...A,class...B>void f(A...a,B...b) with arguments > 1 (because "A...a" is a non-deduced context since it is not the last function parameter pack and it cannot be "catch-all"-deduced to an empty pack because it is not a trailing template parameter pack of f) but GCC accepts it, giving A the empty pack list and B all incoming argument types. – Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 22 '12 at 22:36

Here is another way to have several parameters packs using template template parameters:

#include <iostream>

template <typename... Types>
struct foo {};

template < typename... Types1, template <typename...> class T
         , typename... Types2, template <typename...> class V
         , typename U >
void
bar(const T<Types1...>&, const V<Types2...>&, const U& u)
{
  std::cout << sizeof...(Types1) << std::endl;
  std::cout << sizeof...(Types2) << std::endl;
  std::cout << u << std::endl;
}

int
main()
{
  foo<char, int, float> f1;
  foo<char, int> f2;
  bar(f1, f2, 9);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can this approach be applied to class templates too? – Drew Noakes Oct 21 '14 at 23:49
    
@DrewNoakes I don't think so, as I use functions' parameters to pack the template arguments. – Alexandre Hamez Oct 24 '14 at 12:33
    
Maybe using decltype somehow... – Drew Noakes Oct 24 '14 at 17:21

I found one solution. Wrap each parameter pack in a Tuple. Use a struct for partial specialization. Here's a demo that forwards arguments to a functor by consuming one tuple as a list and accumulating another. Well, this one forwards by copying. Tuples are used in type deduction yet no tuples are used in function parameters, which I think is neat.

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

template < typename ... >
struct two_impl {};

// Base case
template < typename F,
           typename ...Bs >
struct two_impl < F, std::tuple <>, std::tuple< Bs... > >  {
  void operator()(F f, Bs... bs) {
    f(bs...);
  }
};

// Recursive case
template < typename F,
           typename A,
           typename ...As,
           typename ...Bs >
struct two_impl < F, std::tuple< A, As... >, std::tuple< Bs...> >  {
  void operator()(F f, A a, As... as, Bs... bs) {
    auto impl = two_impl < F, std::tuple < As... >, std::tuple < Bs..., A> >();
    impl(f, as..., bs..., a);
  }
};

template < typename F, typename ...Ts >
void two(F f, Ts ...ts) {
  auto impl = two_impl< F, std::tuple < Ts... >, std::tuple <> >();
  impl(f, ts...);
}

struct Test {
  void operator()(int i, float f, double d) {
    std::cout << i << std::endl << f << std::endl << d << std::endl;
  }
};

int main () {
  two(Test(), 1, 1.5f, 2.1);
}

Tuples are a very good compile time list.

share|improve this answer

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