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I'm building a API for my pet software and I'm in the following situation:

A service that use another service. I have a service that use another service for load a Assembly, should I throw a exception in the service that load a assembly or on the service that use that service?

AssemblyService:

    public class AssemblyService : IAssemblyService
    {
        public Assembly Load(string assemblyName)
        {
            Assembly assembly;

            try
            {
                assembly = Assembly.Load(assemblyName);
            }
            catch
            {
                assembly = null;
            }

            return assembly;
        }

        ...

    }

Service that use AssemblyService:

    public class CommandService : ICommandService
    {
        private readonly IAssemblyService assemblyService;

        public CommandService(IAssemblyService assemblyService)
        {
            this.assemblyService = assemblyService;
        }

        public CommandOutput Process(string inputCommand, string requestInfo)
        {
            string commandName = GetAssemblyName(inputCommand);
            string args = GetArgs(inputCommand);

            Assembly assembly = assemblyService.Load(commandName);

            if (assembly == null) throw new UnknownCommandException(commandName);

            ICommand command = assemblyService.GetCommand(assembly);

            return command.Execute(args, requestInfo);
        }

        #region Private methods
        ...
        #endregion
    }

Should I throw the exception in AssemblyService or CommandService like the above example?

I'm trying to learn how to handle a exception, in the above example the line assembly = Assembly.Load(assemblyName); can throw ArgumentNullException, ArgumentException, FileNotFoundException, FileLoadException and BadImageFormatException. Should I handle all these exceptions?

UnknownCommandException(commandName) is a custom exception.

Other question: Anyone who's using my API could know when a method could throw a exception? I see placing the mouse over any methods of .Net Framework you will see if the method could throw a exception. Could this works with methods of my API?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I normally try and avoid using exceptions to control the flow of the program. Your program uses an exception to convert it to a result variable and then converts that back to an exception. Why not stick with exceptions all the way? I would change it as follows:

    public class AssemblyService : IAssemblyService
{
    public Assembly Load(string assemblyName)
    {
        return Assembly.Load(assemblyName);         
    }
}

public class CommandService : ICommandService
{
    private readonly IAssemblyService assemblyService;

    public CommandService(IAssemblyService assemblyService)
    {
        this.assemblyService = assemblyService;
    }

    public CommandOutput Process(string inputCommand, string requestInfo)
    {           
        string commandName = GetAssemblyName(inputCommand);

        try
        {
            string args = GetArgs(inputCommand);

            Assembly assembly = assemblyService.Load(commandName);
            ICommand command = assemblyService.GetCommand(assembly);
            return command.Execute(args, requestInfo);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //Log original exception or add to inner exception
            throw new UnknownCommandException(commandName);
        }                       
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your title is about throwing exceptions but you actually seem to be talking about catching exceptions. You should generally not catch exceptions unless you can do something meaningful to rectify the condition that caused the exception to be thrown in the first place, and in that case you should only catch the explicit exception types that you can handle.

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There are two things to think about here:

  1. Will the normal flow of the application be abruptly halted to the point where it will no longer work? Exceptions are exactly that - a notification that something exceptional (out of the ordinary, abnormal, etc.) has happened. If it isn't exceptional, don't throw an exception. If the user can continue to use the program without noticing, don't use an exception.

  2. How you comment the method declaration will affect this. There should be some markup tags for the comments that will allow you to explain what exception will be thrown and under what circumstances it will be thrown. They look like this:

    /// <exception cref="ExceptionTypeGoesHere"></exception>
    
share|improve this answer

api as the name suggests is the gateway to an application. if an error occurs in the api, it is most useful for the api to tell the consumer why, where and when the error happened i.e. api throws the exception out. it is up to the consumer to catch this and tell its users what to do or if the business logic is defined well the consumer will calculate alternative execution paths. this is my rule of thumb

in the example above the assembly load service should throw the error out. If you handle this in the api, then the consumer will never learn :)

for general guidelines to exception handling look here in Msdn

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