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This is really two questions:

  1. Why isn't the membership operator (__contains__) ever being called?

  2. Why is D in nodeList, but not in nodeSet?

My goal is for D to be "in" both nodeList and nodeSet, because it has the same loc as A.

class Node(object):
    def __init__(self, loc):
        self.loc = loc

    def __eq__(self, other):
        print "eq: self.getLoc(): {}, other.getLoc(): {}".format(self.getLoc(),     other.getLoc())
        if self.getLoc() == other.getLoc():
            return True
        return False

    def __contains__(self, other):
        print "contains: self.getLoc(): {}, other.getLoc(): {}".format(self.getLoc(),  other.getLoc())
        if self.getLoc() == other.getLoc():

            return True
        return False

    def setLoc(self, loc):
        self.loc = loc

    def getLoc(self):
        return self.loc


if __name__ == "__main__":
    A = Node((1,1))
    B = Node((2,2))
    C = Node((3,3))

    D = Node((1,1))

    nodeList = [A, B, C]
    nodeSet = set()
    nodeSet.add(A)
    nodeSet.add(B)
    nodeSet.add(C)

    print "A in nodeList: {}".format(A in nodeList)
    print "A in nodeSet: {}".format(A in nodeSet)
    print "D in nodeList: {}".format(D in nodeList)
    print "D in nodeSet: {}".format(D in nodeSet)

This returns True, True, True, False. Apparently, the __contains__ operator is never called. I would like it to return True, True, True, True.

Any other critiques of my code are of course welcome, as I am a python beginner.

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2  
1. __contains__ is called when you ask an object whether there is another object in it. Here, the __contains__ method of nodeList and nodeSet are being called, not Node's. –  Darthfett Mar 22 '12 at 23:56
    
See this answer -- in short, you need to define __hash__ if you want to get D in nodeSet to return True. As an aside, we generally don't use getters and setters unless they're necessary (which is relatively rare.) –  DSM Mar 22 '12 at 23:57
1  
@DSM and then you use properties not getters and setters. –  katrielalex Mar 23 '12 at 0:14
    
@DSM - Thanks so much for your answer and the link, it helped me immensely. –  user1287170 Mar 23 '12 at 15:49
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2 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

See the documentation re __hash__() - in short:

[I]f [a class] defines __cmp__() or __eq__() but not __hash__(), its instances will not be usable in hashed collections.

A set is a hashed collection. You'll want to make sure you implement Node.__hash__()

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While what you write is true, the poster's actual problem is that contains is implemented on the wrong class. –  James Youngman Mar 23 '12 at 0:13
    
Ah, I'd missed that, thanks, but this should at least answer their second question –  Kristian Glass Mar 23 '12 at 0:15
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Why would Node.__contains__ ever be called? You never have a Node as the right-hand-side of an in expression.

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