Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorting lines by those containing numbers, ignoring numbers attached to a letter

I need to sort the lines in a file, such that lines containing at least one number (0-9), not counting the numbers 1-5 when preceded by one of these letters ("a", "e", "g", "i", "n", "o", "r", "u", "v", or "u:" (u + :)), is moved to the end of the file.

Here is a sample file:

I want to buy some food.
I want 3 chickens.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?

In the sample file, here are notes on which ones match:

I want to buy some food. % does not match
I want 3 chickens. % matches
I have no3 basket for the eggs. % does not match, because "3" is preceded by "o"
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs. % matches, because contains "24"
Move the king to A3. % matches, words preceded by "A" are not ignored.
Can you move the king to a6? % matches, 6 is not 1-5

The output would place all matching lines at the bottom:

I want to buy some food.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I want 3 chickens.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.

Preferably (although not necessary), the solution sorts lines containing the greatest number of matching digits to the end. E.g. "I have 10 chickens and 12 bats." (4 digits) appears after "I have 99 chickens." (2 digits).

Solutions using BASH, Perl, Python 2.7, Ruby, sed, awk, or grep are fine.

share|improve this question
1  
Why is the 24 line before the 3 line? Are they supposed to be sorted, or just partitioned? This is certainly a Perl gig. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 1:34
    
You are right. I have updated the question. –  Village Mar 23 '12 at 1:40
1  
Well, I’ve done the "move to the end" solution. For the sorting, you just want the moved lines sorted by how many total digits occur anywhere, not by what those numeric values actually are? See my answer for the new sorting business. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 1:52
1  
Done. :)⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 1:57
2  
BTW, what on Earth is the reason you need to do this? –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:00

7 Answers 7

If your grep support -P(perl-regexp) option:

pat='(?<=[^0-9]|^)((?<!u:)(?<![aeginoruv])[1-5]|[06-9])'

{ grep -vP "$pat" input.txt; grep -P "$pat" input.txt; } >output.txt

If you have ssed(super sed) installed:

ssed -nR '
/(?<=[^0-9]|^)((?<!u:)(?<![aeginoruv])[1-5]|[06-9])/{
    H
    $!d
}
$!p
${
    g
    s/\n//
    p
}' input.txt
share|improve this answer
1  
Pretty good, but I think it misses the specifics of "u:" and "moving lines to the end" –  John3136 Mar 23 '12 at 0:53
1  
@John3136 Thanks to remind. –  kev Mar 23 '12 at 1:10
1  
That’s missing the constraint that only the little digits have the negative lookbehind. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 1:50
1  
@tchrist Thanks to remind. –  kev Mar 23 '12 at 3:13

When this program is run on your dataset:

#!/usr/bin/env perl    
use strict;
use warnings;

my @moved = ();

my $pat = qr{
      [67890]                   # these big digits anywhere, or else...
    | (?<! [aeginoruv]   )      # none of those letters before
      (?<! u:            )      # nor a "u:" before
      [12345]                   # these little digits
}x;

while (<>) {
    if (/$pat/) {
        push @moved, $_;
    } else {
        print;
    }
}

print @moved;

It produces your desired output:

I want to buy some food.
I want 3 chickens.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?

EDIT

To incorporate the sorting, change the final print to this:

print for sort {
    $a =~ y/0-9// <=> $b =~ y/0-9//
} @moved;

And now the output will be this:

I want to buy some food.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I want 3 chickens.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
share|improve this answer
1  
Won't your final sort put "1 2 a1" ahead of "1 a1 g1"? –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:10
1  
@DSM Not necessarily. Those both contain three digits, so they sort equal. Since I’m using a stable sort, that means they will retain their original ranking. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:14
1  
But neither a1 or g1 are matching: am I misinterpreting "the greatest number of matching digits"? (Entirely possible.) IOW I assumed that a file consisting of only "1 2 a1/1 a1 g1" should be reversed. –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:15
1  
@DSM: You’re right: I’m matching all digits for the sort irrespective of whether they have that weird lookbehind. What would you do with "a123", count it as two digits not three? Very complicated. I have no idea whether that’s actually what he wants. It’s not really very well specified. I’m also unclear on spaces. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:20
1  
Indeed, I would count "a123" as having two matching digits. –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:30

This sounds like a job for perl!

Seriously, sed will struggle with the requirement to move "u:" to the end of the file. sed is really line based. Awk could do it, but perl is probably better.

Use \d+ to match a line with digits

Then use [aeginorv]\d+ to filter out your letters

u:\d+ to handle your special case u: stuff (you're going to have to buffer this up [e.g. just store matching lines in an array] so you can output it at the end)

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question to include perl and other languages. –  Village Mar 23 '12 at 0:56
use strict;
use v5.10.1;
my @matches;
my @no_matches;
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;

    if ($line =~ / \d+\W/) {
        #say "MATCH $line"; 
        push @matches, $line;
    }
    elsif ($line =~ /u:[1-5]+\b/) {
        #say "NOMATCH   $line"; 
        push @no_matches, $line;
    }
    elsif ($line =~ /[^aeginoruv][1-5]+\b/) {
        #say "MATCH $line"; 
        push @matches, $line;
    }
    elsif ($line =~ /.[6-90]/) {
        #say "MATCH $line"; 
        push @matches, $line;
    }
    else {
        #say "NOMATCH   $line";
        push @no_matches, $line;
    }
}

foreach (@no_matches){
    say $_;
}
foreach (@matches){
    say $_;
}

__DATA__
I want to buy some food.
I want 3 chickens.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
What is u:34?                              <- custom test 
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?

PROMPT> perl regex.pl

I want to buy some food.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
What is u:34?                              <- custom test
I want 3 chickens.
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?
share|improve this answer

Ruby

(Edit: now includes optional sort)

matches = []
non_matches = []
File.open("lines.txt").each do |line|
  if line.match(/[67890]|(?<![aeginoruv])(?<!u:)[12345]/)
    matches.push line
  else
    non_matches.push line
  end
end
puts non_matches + matches.sort_by{|m| m.scan(/\d/).length}

produces:

I want to buy some food.
I want 3 chickens.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
share|improve this answer
1  
You’ll need a /x for your spaces. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:07
1  
...or remove the spaces :) –  Mark Thomas Mar 23 '12 at 2:21
1  
Well yeah. It’s not so bad in this pattern because it’s pretty small, but I have developed a real fondness for /x patterns to add whitespace between logical pieces even when I’m not doing the full commented form the way I did in my solution. It’s funny how alike the Ruby and Perl solutions are (well, mine) compared to the Python one. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:26
1  
@tchrist: I'm unusual in that I don't like regexes. Most of the Python gurus around here would have written one too and it would have looked a lot like your codes, but what fun would that be? ;-) –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:32
1  
Perhaps it's my Perl heritage showing. –  Mark Thomas Mar 23 '12 at 2:33

[Edited because everyone else had a code which accepted a file argument:]

For a non-regex solution in Python, how about

import sys

def keyfunc(s):
    ignores = ("a", "e", "g", "i", "n", "o", "r", "u", "v", "u:")
    return sum(c.isdigit() and not (1 <= int(c) <= 5 and s[:i].endswith(ignores)) 
               for i,c in enumerate(s))

with open(sys.argv[1]) as infile:
    for line in sorted(infile, key=keyfunc):
        print line,

which produces:

I want to buy some food.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I want 3 chickens.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.
I have 99 chickens.
I have 10 chickens and 12 bats.
share|improve this answer
    
That's the wrong output!! –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:11
    
@tchrist: could you be specific? I'm terrible at arithmetic, but it looks okay to me. –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:16
    
It’s the interpretion of the "no3 ... 24 eggs" thing. Looks like three digits to me. Would no34 be only 1 digit? Can’t know, because he doesn’t have a full input set and full desired output. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:23
    
Yeah, I don't count "o3" as a match, because it's a digit between 1 and 5 which is preceded by an "o". See the comment the OP wrote beside line 3: "does not match, because "3" is preceded by "o"". –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 2:26
    
Oh, I read that, which is why I don’t move those. But I don’t see where you don’t count the total digits. Mine does what his input/output set does. There are unanswered questions though. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 2:27

This might work for you:

sed 'h;s/[aeginoruv][1-5]\|u:[1-5]//g;s/[^0-9]//g;s/^$/0/;G;s/\n/\t/' file |
sort -sn |
sed 's/^[^\t]*\t//'
I want to buy some food.
I have no3 basket for the eggs.
I want 3 chickens.
Move the king to A3.
Can you move the king to a6?
I have no3 basket which can hold 24 eggs.

Basically a three step move:

  1. Make a numeric key by which to sort the output. Lines that don't need sorting are given a key of 0, all others their numeric value.
  2. Sort by the numeric key keeping order -s
  3. Remove the numeric key.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.