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My function parses segments from a text file using a opening and a closing string (see main()) and saves the segments in separate files.

I don't know what is wrong with it but it returns these 3 segment files:

1 START_TEXT_END
2 _START_BLABLUB_END
3 START 4 END

for this input test.txt (4 START ... END segments):

_START_TEXT_END_START_BLABLUB_END_
_START_THIRD_END START 4 END

"START" and "END" are supposed to be included but segment 3 ("START_THIRD_END") is missing and the 2. segment erroneously includes a "_". With other input files it also returns simply inaccurate results. Any idea ?

#include "stdio.h"
#include "string.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

long split(char *filename, char *segment_filename, char *str_start, char *str_end, long n_start, long n_end) {
    long segments = 0, size_segment = 0;
    FILE *file = fopen(filename, "rb"), *segmentfile;
    long size_str_start = strlen(str_start);
    long size_str_end = strlen(str_end);
    long pos_str_start = 0;
    long pos_str_end = 0;
    int chr;
    char *segment_filename_numbered;
    char *segment = (char*)malloc(1);
    fseek(file,0,0);

    if (file) {
        while ( (chr = fgetc(file)) != EOF && !feof(file) && !ferror(file)) {
            size_segment++;

            // scan for start string
            if ( chr == str_start[pos_str_start] ) { pos_str_start++; }
            else pos_str_start = 0;
            if ( pos_str_start == size_str_start )
            size_segment = size_str_start, pos_str_start = 0;

            // scan for end string
            if ( chr == str_end[pos_str_end] ) pos_str_end++;
            else pos_str_end = 0;

            if ( pos_str_end == size_str_end )
            {
                pos_str_end = 0;
                segments++;
                if (segments > n_start) {
                    segment = (char*) realloc(segment, size_segment);
                    //segment_filename_numbered = chars_cat2( segment_filename, chars_number(segments,     '0', 8, 16) ); // SOME OF MY LIBRARY FUNCTIONS
                    segment_filename_numbered = ltoa(segments, segment_filename_numbered, 10);
                    fseek(file, -size_segment, SEEK_CUR);
                    fread(segment, size_segment, 1, file);
                    segmentfile = fopen(segment_filename_numbered, "wb");
                    fwrite(segment, size_segment, 1, segmentfile);
                    fseek(file, size_segment, SEEK_CUR);
                    fclose(segmentfile);
                }
            }
        }

        fclose(file);
    }

    return segments;
}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    split("test.txt", "test_", "START", "END", 0, 0);
    system("Pause");
    return 0;
}

I'm new here, adding 4 spaces in front of each line manually is a total nightmare, what is the easy way of marking code ?

share|improve this question
    
Highlight all the code and click the {} button. –  torrential coding Mar 23 '12 at 1:21
1  
I realise this is quite a lot to ask, but would repaste your code, with the indentation preserved, and then do the {}? It is a little bit hard to read. Sorry. –  gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 1:38
    
How big is the file? Try using mmap() (MapViewOfFile in Window$) –  William Morris Mar 23 '12 at 11:43

4 Answers 4

There may be other problems but one sure error is the call:

segment_filename_numbered = ltoa(segments, segment_filename_numbered, 10);

segment_filename_numbered is defined as a pointer but needs to be a buffer large enough to hold the string representation of the number segments

char segment_filename_numbered[16];
ltoa(segments, segment_filename_numbered, 10);

I've not come across ltoa before. I would normally use snprintf, which allows you to state the buffer size to avoid an overflow.

EDIT

No offense meant, but you are flogging a dead horse trying to debug this program. My suggestion is that you investigate the standard library string functions (strstr, strchr etc) and rewrite the program, reading more than one char at a time. Does the program have an application - in other words is it to be used somewhere/by someone - or is it an exercise?

share|improve this answer
    
put another way, segment_filename_numbered is a char pointer, but it has not been initialised to point to any space, so it is pointing to random rubbish, which ltoa uses. –  gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 2:23
    
well my chars_cat2 ( commented out because ) function allocates memory correctly - that line is just so everyone can compile it. But it's still good to know and I will take a look at that snprintf() thing anyway. –  user1287246 Mar 23 '12 at 2:31
    
@William I see that performance issue, it is going to be used on large files, it works now, its fast enough (its not going to be used very often) - I think I wont bother optimizing it, it would get complicated. Thank you anyway –  user1287246 Mar 23 '12 at 3:19
    
@William Morris - Now that I have turned it into a three-state state machine, it seems to look pretty straightforward! –  gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 5:01

OK, got it this time I think. The issue is this line:

fseek(file, size_segment, SEEK_CUR);

It isn't needed, because the line "fread(segment, size_segment, 1, file);" already moved the file position of size_segment bytes ahead. There you double the fseek in fact. That's why you're skipping chars (try printing the value of chr at each loop run, it's skipping chars)

share|improve this answer
    
Well done! Funny - I was so confused, I felt I wanted to fseek(file, 0, SEEK_CUR) just to find where the file pointer is :-) –  gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 3:39

I think your problem is in your seek back, to fetch the data between separators:

fseek(file, -size_segment, SEEK_CUR);

The problem is you go back "size_segment" bytes, but you've read more : size_segment + size_str_end (the segment ending). You should write:

fseek(file, -size_segment - size_str_end,SEEK_CUR);

Now, it doesn't seem very efficient to process data this way (read data, find the ending, seek back to the data, write to file, seek then to the previous position). Why don't you write data as soon as you read it in the output file, and change the output file when you encounter the end text ?

And it would be cleaner if you first searched the start text in a loop, then the data (which you write to a file), while expecting the end text. Here, you've got everything at the same time, it's hard to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
The function is actually supposed to store the segments including the separators... But YEAH THANKS MAN of course I'll write the segment files as soon as I've read the opening separator ! How could I miss that - anyway that should solve it, –  user1287246 Mar 23 '12 at 2:24

The line

while ( (chr = fgetc(file)) != EOF && !feof(file) ...

Is a bit odd. One test or the other is enough, but it doesn't matter.

I hope you don't mind, but I tried to organise the program along the style I might write, to see if I could see a bug. It helped me read it, but I didn't see any new bug, only William Morris's :-(

I think I might be tempted to 'fseek 0' to get the file position for the start and end, even though it is not as efficient. At least it might help debug it?-)

It might help others to follow it. If I have made a mistake, it might be an area which is not obvious.

#include "stdio.h"
#include "string.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

long split(char *filename, char *segment_filename, 
           char *str_start, char *str_end, 
           long n_start, long n_end) {
    long segments = 0, size_segment = 0;
    FILE *file, *segmentfile;
    long size_str_start = strlen(str_start);
    long size_str_end = strlen(str_end);
    long pos_str_start = 0;
    long pos_str_end = 0;
    int chr;
    char *segment_filename_numbered;
    char *segment = (char*)malloc(1);
    // fseek(file,0,0);
    enum {LOOKING_FOR_START, LOOKING_FOR_END, MATCHED_MARKERS } 
         state = LOOKING_FOR_START;

    if ((file=fopen(filename, "rb")) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error: can't open file %s\n", filename);
        return 0;
    }

    while ( (chr = fgetc(file)) != EOF && !feof(file) && !ferror(file)) {
        size_segment++;

        switch (state) {
            case LOOKING_FOR_START:
                // scan for start string
                if ( chr == str_start[pos_str_start] ) { pos_str_start++; }
                else pos_str_start = 0;
                if ( pos_str_start == size_str_start ) {
                    size_segment = size_str_start; 
                    pos_str_start = 0;
                    state = LOOKING_FOR_END;
                }
                break;
            case LOOKING_FOR_END:
                // scan for end string
                if ( chr == str_end[pos_str_end] ) pos_str_end++;
                else pos_str_end = 0;
                if ( pos_str_end == size_str_end )
                {
                    pos_str_end = 0;
                    state = MATCHED_MARKERS;
                }
                break;
            case MATCHED_MARKERS:
                segments++;
                if (segments > n_start) {
                    segment = (char*) realloc(segment, size_segment);
                    //segment_filename_numbered = chars_cat2( segment_filename, chars_number(segments,     '0', 8, 16) ); // SOME OF MY LIBRARY FUNCTIONS
                    //*** Error: uninitialised segment_filename_numbered *** 
                    segment_filename_numbered = ltoa(segments, segment_filename_numbered, 10); 
                    fseek(file, -size_segment, SEEK_CUR);
                    fread(segment, size_segment, 1, file);
                    segmentfile = fopen(segment_filename_numbered, "wb");
                    fwrite(segment, size_segment, 1, segmentfile);
                    fseek(file, size_segment, SEEK_CUR);
                    fclose(segmentfile);
                }
                state = LOOKING_FOR_START;
            default:
                fprintf(stderr, "Fatal Error: state has become corrupt, value is %d\n", state);
                break;
        }
    }

    fclose(file);

    return segments;

}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    split("test.txt", "test_", "START", "END", 0, 0);
    system("Pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@user1287246 - I apologise, I will correct my answer. –  gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 1:56

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