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I'm using Backbone and therefore Underscore to render my templates. My templates get rendered in <script> tags and then I use jQuery to grab their html. My backbone view looks like this:

App.ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
    className:'well',

    events: {
        'click .continue': 'handleContinueClick',
    },

    initialize: function() {
        this.template = _.template($("#ItemTemplate").html())
        this.render()
    },

    render: function() {
        $(this.el).html(this.template({model:this.model}))
    },

    handleContinueClick: function(e) {
        alert('Clicked!')
    }
})

My Issue is I would like to only go and grab the html once and only once for this particular type of view so that if I have a lot of items it doesn't go searching the html for this template each time.

Basically how do I properly store the template variable at the ItemView object level (not instance of the view) keeping in mind that the retrieval of the html has to wait until after page load (so that I can guarantee the template html is available).

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Is there a reason you're worrying about this? I do hope you understand the evils of premature optimization. –  JayC Mar 23 '12 at 2:29
    
sure, if someone can tell me it doesn't matter, I'm cool with that. you're right it's prolly early, I'm just curious. –  MattoTodd Mar 23 '12 at 2:31
1  
@JayC - you're basically saying "DOM access for the same thing, multiple times, is premature optimization" which is pretty far from the truth. If the data never changes, only request it once. –  Derick Bailey Mar 23 '12 at 2:36
3  
@JayC - What does it matter why he's worrying about it? He may not even be working on a project at all, but is instead just simply trying to learn about best practices because he is interested. In either case if he wanted to know "when" to optimize I'm sure that's how the question would have been phrased. –  apiguy Mar 23 '12 at 16:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can build a very simple object that caches the templates for you:


TemplateCache = {
  get: function(selector){
    if (!this.templates){ this.templates = {}; }

    var template = this.templates[selector];
    if (!template){
      var tmpl = $(selector).html();
      template = _.template(tmpl);
      this.templates[selector] = template;
    }

    return template;
  }
}

Then in your view, you can call TemplateCache.get and pass in your template selector.


Backbone.View.extend({
  template: "#ItemTemplate",

  render: function(){
    var template = TemplateCache.get(this.template);
    var html = template(this.model.toJSON());
    this.$el.html(html);
  }
});

The first time you call TemplateCache.get for a given selector, it will load it from the DOM. Any subsequent calls to get the template will load it from the cached version and prevent the extra DOM access call.

FWIW: I have a much more robust version of the TemplateCache object in my Backbone.Marionette framework: https://github.com/derickbailey/backbone.marionette

share|improve this answer
2  
Just to clarify: why wouldn't you cache the template constructor instead of or as well as the html string itself? –  JayC Mar 23 '12 at 2:47
1  
@JayC - there is a measurable difference in performance at some point, yes. see the book "High Performance JavaScript" for more info. As for calling _.template in the TemplateCache, yes that would be a good thing to do. I just didn't think about that when I wrote the answer here. :) –  Derick Bailey Mar 23 '12 at 3:08
3  
@JayC just for fun, I put together a JSPerf test: jsperf.com/dom-select-vs-cache ... I don't know if this test is perfect, but it should illustrate the difference. Whether or not the difference is noticeable in most real use cases... maybe not. –  Derick Bailey Mar 23 '12 at 3:17
1  
@JayC - The difference is that the size and depth of the DOM, as well as the complexity of the selectors makes the lookup time quite volatile, where pulling from a pre-indexed cache will return consistently in the same amount of time. –  apiguy Mar 23 '12 at 16:39
1  
@Derick posted in his blog a nice article with all the info of this lostechies.com/derickbailey/2012/04/10/… –  corbacho Apr 26 '12 at 13:16

Most Backbone examples I've seen do it like this. This will only traverse the DOM once to parse the template when the page finishes loading and use that for each new ItemView().

App.ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
    template: _.template($("#ItemTemplate").html()),

    className:'well',

    events: {
        'click .continue': 'handleContinueClick',
    },

    ...
});

http://backbonejs.org/docs/todos.html#section-21

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3  
There's a danger in doing that, in that your template may not load at all. lostechies.com/derickbailey/2011/11/09/… –  Derick Bailey Mar 23 '12 at 12:30
2  
If this code appears after the template (and therefore after the template is loaded), then there shouldn't be any danger. Simple and readable. This is my preferred technique. –  Johnny Oshika Apr 11 '12 at 7:52

You could muck around with prototype.template by hand and compile the template the first time you create an instance of your view. Something like this:

initialize: function() {
    if(!this.constructor.prototype.template)
        this.constructor.prototype.template = _.template($("#ItemTemplate").html());
    this.render();
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/e6y3F/

The trick is to get your hands on the right prototype.

share|improve this answer
    
This method will render the template as well as parse it. If you're template takes input data to render, then you should leave template.render() for the View's template function. –  supershnee Feb 13 at 23:52
    
@supershnee: Not sure what you mean, _.template(html) just returns the compile template function, I see no call to this.template() anywhere and template.render() would probably just produce a TypeError as compiled Underscore templates don't have render methods. Your answer below is pretty much the same thing as mine. –  mu is too short Feb 14 at 0:17
    
Sorry, meant this.render(). –  supershnee Feb 14 at 13:21
    
@supershnee: I still don't see your point. render is, presumably, filling in the template, initialize is just stashing the compiled template function in the view's prototype. –  mu is too short Feb 14 at 23:07

You could store the compiled template in a closure so that only the instances of ItemView can access it:

(function() {

    var template;

    App.ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({

        className:'well',

        events: {
            'click .continue': 'handleContinueClick'
        },

        initialize: function() {
            this.render();
        },

        render: function() {
            template = template || _.template($("#ItemTemplate").html());
            $(this.el).html(template({model:this.model}));
        },

        handleContinueClick: function(e) {
            alert('Clicked!');
        }

    });

})();
share|improve this answer

Another solution using prototype:

 initialize: function(option) {
     if (!this.template) App.ItemView.prototype.template = this.template || _.template($('ItemTemplate').html());
 }
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