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for iOS 5.0 using ARC, here is something I want to implement and need direction on how it can be best done. I have some global settings that determine the state of each object in the object tree. I need this to be just one instance shared by all objects and their children so that on changing the settings, the behaviour of these objects change as well... to make it clear, its something like this..

                       Global Settings (current language)
                               |(should affect)
                    ---------------------------- 
                    |                          |
                 GenericParent1            GenericParent2
                    |                          |
              ------------
              |          |
          ChildType1    ChildType2
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While borrden answer is correct, (singletons are used in case you want to make sure you have only one instance runing) the implementation should be something like this:

+(MyClass *)singleton {
 static dispatch_once_t pred;
 static MyClass *shared = nil;

 dispatch_once(&pred, ^{
  shared = [[MyClass alloc] init];
 });
 return shared;
}

So that you can take advantage of the grand central dispatch.

You can read more about this here: http://cocoasamurai.blogspot.jp/2011/04/singletons-your-doing-them-wrong.html

Edit:

With static implementation, do you mean something like global variables? If i understand correctly you want to "share" a state between 2 or more instances that come from the same parent. However each instance has its own local variables and those inherited, but still the inherited ones are specific for THAT instance. If you want to share a state between these objects you need something global to communicate. For example, if you want to share an object between 2 instances you have to make their pointers point to the same object, then you can read the "state" saved in that object for both and if you change it from one place it will change from the other. The problem with this is that you cannot ensure you will only have one instance of that object. You might even by mistake create more than one and be accessing a different one on your methods. This is what a singleton solves, even if you try creating a new one you will just get the original.

Alternatively you can have a global variable and share information trough that. but that approach is not very well looked upon, because it makes your code a little hard to understand sometimes.

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Ah ha! I was looking for a compelling reason to use this way instead. I guess thread safety is it. –  borrrden Mar 23 '12 at 3:27
    
Thank you for the quick help!. I think both the solutions are good!... what would be the difference between the static and the singleton implementation? I ask so I can choose based on the pros and cons –  inforeqd Mar 23 '12 at 3:33
    
yes, actually using gcd has become very compelling lately without that much danger. Since it will automatically try to optimize your program to take advantage of multiple cores in the devices (iphone 4s, ipad 2, ipad 3). –  Chiquis Mar 23 '12 at 3:34
    
They are the same idea, but Luis' version is newer and safer so you should use it instead. Both are considered "singleton." A quick note though, you will lose support for pre iOS 4 devices if that matters to you (This includes only the original iPhone and iPod touch though, so in the iPhone 4S era it is quickly becoming a nonissue). –  borrrden Mar 23 '12 at 3:37
    
@user962724 Doesnt fit here, check the edit of my answer. –  Chiquis Mar 23 '12 at 3:39

For this pattern I recommend a singleton. Instead of alloc/initing your Global Settings each time, retrieve them via a static method like this:

static GlobalSettings kGlobalSettings;

//...

+ (GlobalSettings *)sharedSettings
{
    if(!kGlobalSettings)
        kGlobalSettings = [[GlobalSettings alloc] init];

    return kGlobalSettings;
}

Then when you need it just call GlobalSettings *settings = [GlobalSettings sharedSettings];

EDIT: This method is outdated and obsolete...Luis' implementation is better.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the quick help!. I think both the solutions are good!... what would be the difference between the static and the singleton implementation? I ask so I can choose based on the pros and cons –  inforeqd Mar 23 '12 at 3:32

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