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I'm using a jquery function I found to find words in a div and highlight them. I'm using this along with a search tool so the case is not always going to match the words exactly. How can I convert this to make it case insensitive?

$.fn.highlight = function(what,spanClass) {
    return this.each(function(){
        var container = this,
            content = container.innerHTML,
            pattern = new RegExp('(>[^<.]*)(' + what + ')([^<.]*)','g'),
            replaceWith = '$1<span ' + ( spanClass ? 'class="' + spanClass + '"' : '' ) + '">$2</span>$3',
            highlighted = content.replace(pattern,replaceWith);
        container.innerHTML = highlighted;
    });
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
pattern = new RegExp('(>[^<.]*)(' + what + ')([^<.]*)','gi')

add the 'i' flag to make it case insensitive

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Just add the 'i' flag.

pattern = new RegExp('(>[^<.]*)(' + what + ')([^<.]*)','gi')
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$.fn.highlight = function(what,spanClass) {
return this.each(function(){
    var container = this,
        content = container.innerHTML,
        pattern = new RegExp('(>[^<.]*)(' + what + ')([^<.]*)','gi'),
        replaceWith = '$1<span ' + ( spanClass ? 'class="' + spanClass + '"' : '' ) + '">$2</span>$3',
        highlighted = content.replace(pattern,replaceWith);
    container.innerHTML = highlighted;
});

}

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Just add "i":

pattern = new RegExp('(>[^<.]*)(' + what + ')([^<.]*)','gi'),

From MDN:

Regular expressions have four optional flags that allow for global and case insensitive searching. To indicate a global search, use the g flag. To indicate a case-insensitive search, use the i flag. To indicate a multi-line search, use the m flag. To perform a "sticky" search, that matches starting at the current position in the target string, use the y flag. These flags can be used separately or together in any order, and are included as part of the regular expression.

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