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This looks really simple, but I could not find any guides/ instructions on how to do it, so hopefully someone from SO can tell.

So I have a rails application.

I have an AWS EC2 account. I created a server with fog.io and can ssh into it etc.. How do I actually deploy the application to this server so that it shows up at the ip etc.. A link to a guide or some directions would be greatly appreciated.

I am not really married to fog, I can do rubber, but could not find any guides that show what to do after the server is created (e.g. how to actually send my rails app there get it to show up at some ip etc..)

I guess I am spoiled by heroku deployment and fog looks like a quite simple solution. I really need EC2 functionality though, so other hostings are not the option really..

Thanks!

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If you don't care about whizzy scaling up, scaling down stuff, then just plug that ip into whatever deploy solution you would normally use –  Frederick Cheung Mar 24 '12 at 10:51

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You might want to take a look at https://github.com/wr0ngway/rubber. It uses fog since the 2.0.0.pre version. I am trying the latest version now and I don't know how it goes. But I used the 1.5.0 version for a previous project.

As it says 'The rubber plugin enables relatively complex multi-instance deployments of RubyOnRails applications to Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2).'

I think it's pretty useful because it manages all the deployment (software installation, configuration, app deployment) for me. I found the documentation is rare so you have to figure it out yourself if you get any problem. Anyway, just give it a try.

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Yes, if you are doing Rails with EC2 you really should be using rubber. –  messick Apr 3 '12 at 16:38

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