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I have created a vector of sets in my program, and I need to go through each of the sets. In case a specific element is found in the set, I need to add a new set to the vector. However, this gives me a segmentation fault as soon as my array's counter reaches the elements that I inserted later (within the loop). In the following code, switching on list.push_back(cS) gives me a segmentation fault.

int main(void)  {
set<int> cS;
vector<set<int> > list;

cS.insert(1);
list.push_back(cS);

cS.insert(2);
list.push_back(cS);

for (int ctr = 0; ctr < list.size(); ctr++)
{
    for (set<int>::iterator itr = list[ctr].begin(); itr != list[ctr].end(); itr++)
    {
        if (*itr == 1 || *itr == 2)
        {
            cS.clear();
            cS.insert(3);
            //list.push_back(cS);
        }
    }
}

for (int ctr = 0; ctr < list.size(); ctr++)
{
    for (set<int>::iterator itr = list[ctr].begin(); itr != list[ctr].end(); itr++)
    {
        cout << *itr << endl;
    }
}

return 0;
}

I would be grateful if someone could explain why this gives an error (in gcc).

Thank you for going through my post.

share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiosity, why do you use iterators for the set but not the vector? –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 23 '12 at 7:41
    
Out of habit, I guess. As far as I know, for a vector, using an iterator or an index are equivalent. –  Arani Mar 23 '12 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you push_back into your vector you invalidate all references to elements in it in the case the vector needs to allocate more memory. In your case the iterator itr becomes invalid after the push_back. One solution would be to add the sets to a separate list (vector) and then append them all at once after the for loop:

vector<set<int> > add;
for (int ctr = 0; ctr < list.size(); ctr++)
{
    for (set<int>::iterator itr = list[ctr].begin(); itr != list[ctr].end(); itr++)
    {
        if (*itr == 1 || *itr == 2)
        {
            cS.clear();
            cS.insert(3);
            add.push_back(cS);
        }
    }
}
list.insert(list.end(), add.begin(), add.end());
share|improve this answer
    
In that case, is there no way to iterate through each element of the vector, while in special cases inserting some elements to it? –  Arani Mar 23 '12 at 7:41
    
push_back doesn't necessarily invalidate iterators, some call to push_back might invalidate. –  Nawaz Mar 23 '12 at 7:43
    
@user571376: use index-based iteration. –  Nawaz Mar 23 '12 at 7:43
    
The exact rules here are covered in an FAQ post: stackoverflow.com/questions/6438086/iterator-invalidation-rules –  je4d Mar 23 '12 at 7:44
1  
@Nawaz Correct, but the only way to code is to assume it does. –  Andreas Brinck Mar 23 '12 at 7:45

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