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How can I find the duplicates in a Python list and create another list of the duplicates? The list is just integers.

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8  
@agf That question is about Java, not Python. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 23 '12 at 8:04
3  
@LevLevitsky Ok, so find one of the 100s of identical Python questions. –  agf Mar 23 '12 at 8:16
1  
do you want the duplicates once, or every time it is seen again? –  moooeeeep Mar 23 '12 at 9:21
1  
Whilst there are many other questions about how to remove duplicates from Python lists, none that I could find demonstrate how to add the duplicates to another list. –  MFB Mar 25 '12 at 22:33
6  
Someone should make a list of those questions and write a script to remove duplicates. –  James Bradbury Aug 7 '14 at 15:00

8 Answers 8

up vote 100 down vote accepted

To remove duplicates use set(a), to print duplicates - something like

a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]

import collections
print [item for item, count in collections.Counter(a).items() if count > 1]

## [1, 2, 5]

Note that Counter is not particularly efficient (timings) and probably an overkill here, set will perform better:

seen = set()
uniq = []
for x in a:
    if x not in seen:
        uniq.append(x)
        seen.add(x)

or, more concisely:

seen = set()
uniq = [x for x in a if x not in seen and not seen.add(x)]    

I don't recommend the latter style though.

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8  
Great answer but NB: needs 2.7 to work –  Jura Aug 22 '12 at 19:03
    
I find this code does not work with a list of lists. The solution suggested by @ritesh does work with a list of lists. I am using python version 2.7.6. –  kalu Mar 4 '14 at 18:55
    
"Counter is not particularly efficient (timings)" in the link you provide, Counter is more efficient than set for the timing... –  mpgn May 12 at 8:26
    
How are you python guys this cool? :-) Thank you –  SpiderMan Aug 27 at 4:26
>>> l = [1,2,3,4,4,5,5,6,1]
>>> set([x for x in l if l.count(x) > 1])
set([1, 4, 5])
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4  
+1, very simple and works in 2.6 –  JohnJ Jun 20 '13 at 20:08
    
Is there any reason you use a list comprehension instead of a generator comprehension? –  Polymorphic Potato Sep 4 '14 at 13:08
4  
Indeed, a simple solution, but complexity is squared because each count() parses the list all over again, so don't use for large lists. –  danuker Feb 10 at 15:35

You don't need the count, just whether or not the item was seen before. Adapted that answer to this problem:

def list_duplicates(seq):
  seen = set()
  seen_add = seen.add
  # adds all elements it doesn't know yet to seen and all other to seen_twice
  seen_twice = set( x for x in seq if x in seen or seen_add(x) )
  # turn the set into a list (as requested)
  return list( seen_twice )

a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]
list_duplicates(a) # yields [1, 2, 5]

Just in case speed matters, here are some timings:

# file: test.py
import collections

def thg435(l):
    return [x for x, y in collections.Counter(l).items() if y > 1]

def moooeeeep(l):
    seen = set()
    seen_add = seen.add
    # adds all elements it doesn't know yet to seen and all other to seen_twice
    seen_twice = set( x for x in l if x in seen or seen_add(x) )
    # turn the set into a list (as requested)
    return list( seen_twice )

def RiteshKumar(l):
    return list(set([x for x in l if l.count(x) > 1]))

l = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]*100

And indeed, mine appears to be fastest:

$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test' 'test.moooeeeep(test.l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 134 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test' 'test.thg435(test.l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 415 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test' 'test.RiteshKumar(test.l)'
10 loops, best of 3: 19.2 msec per loop
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2  
Just curious - what's the purpose of seen_add = seen.add here? –  Jura Aug 22 '12 at 19:19
1  
@Rob This way you just call the function you've looked up once before. Otherwise you would need to look up (a dictionary query) the member function add every time an insert would be necessary. –  moooeeeep Aug 29 '12 at 20:09
    
checked with my own data and Ipython's %timeit your method does look fastest on test BUT: "The slowest run took 4.34 times longer than the fastest. This could mean that an intermediate result is being cached" –  Joop May 6 at 7:14

collections.Counter is new in python 2.7:


Python 2.5.4 (r254:67916, May 31 2010, 15:03:39) 
[GCC 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46)] on linux2
a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]
import collections
print [x for x, y in collections.Counter(a).items() if y > 1]
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
  File "", line 1, in 
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Counter'
>>> 

In an earlier version you can use a conventional dict instead:

a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]
d = {}
for elem in a:
    if elem in d:
        d[elem] += 1
    else:
        d[elem] = 1

print [x for x, y in d.items() if y > 1]
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3  
This is not an answer –  John La Rooy Mar 23 '12 at 9:00
    
Given the vague question, I don't think it's a bad answer. –  jdborg Oct 29 '12 at 11:05

I came across this question whilst looking in to something related - and wonder why no-one offered a generator based solution? Solving this problem would be:

>>> print list(getDupes_9([1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]))
[1, 2, 5]

I was concerned with scalability, so tested several approaches, including naive items that work well on small lists, but scale horribly as lists get larger (note- would have been better to use timeit, but this is illustrative).

I included moooeeeep for comparison (it is impressively fast) and an itertools approach that is even faster again...

Advantages

  • very quick simple to test for 'any' duplicates using the same code

Assumptions

  • Duplicates should be reported once only
  • Duplicate order does not need to be preserved
  • Duplicate might be anywhere in the list

Fastest solution, 1m entries:

def getDupes(c):
    '''iter*/sorted'''
    a, b = itertools.tee(sorted(c))
    next(b, None)
    r = None
    for k, g in itertools.ifilter(lambda x: x[0]==x[1], itertools.izip(a, b)):
        if k != r:
            yield k
            r = k

Approaches tested

import itertools
import time

def getDupes_1(c):
    '''naive'''
    for i in xrange(0, len(c)):
        if c[i] in c[:i]:
            yield c[i]

def getDupes_2(c):
    '''set len change'''
    s = set()
    for i in c:
        l = len(s)
        s.add(i)
        if len(s) == l:
            yield i

def getDupes_3(c):
    '''in dict'''
    d = {}
    for i in c:
        if i in d:
            if d[i]:
                yield i
                d[i] = False
        else:
            d[i] = True

def getDupes_4(c):
    '''in set'''
    s,r = set(),set()
    for i in c:
        if i not in s:
            s.add(i)
        elif i not in r:
            r.add(i)
            yield i

def getDupes_5(c):
    '''sort/adjacent'''
    c = sorted(c)
    r = None
    for i in xrange(1, len(c)):
        if c[i] == c[i - 1]:
            if c[i] != r:
                yield c[i]
                r = c[i]

def getDupes_6(c):
    '''sort/groupby'''
    for k, g in itertools.groupby(sorted(c)):
        if len(list(g)) > 1:
            yield k

def getDupes_7(c):
    '''sort/zip'''
    c = sorted(c)
    r = None
    for k, g in zip(c[:-1],c[1:]):
        if k == g:
            if k != r:
                yield k
                r = k

def getDupes_8(c):
    '''sort/izip'''
    c = sorted(c)
    r = None
    for k, g in itertools.izip(c[:-1],c[1:]):
        if k == g:
            if k != r:
                yield k
                r = k

def getDupes_9(c):
    '''sort/tee/izip'''
    a, b = itertools.tee(sorted(c))
    next(b, None)
    r = None
    for k, g in itertools.izip(a, b):
        if k == g:
            if k != r:
                yield k
                r = k

def getDupes_a(l):
    '''moooeeeep'''
    seen = set()
    seen_add = seen.add
    # adds all elements it doesn't know yet to seen and all other to seen_twice
    for x in l:
        if x in seen or seen_add(x):
            yield x

def getDupes_b(c):
    '''iter*/sorted'''
    a, b = itertools.tee(sorted(c))
    next(b, None)
    r = None
    for k, g in itertools.ifilter(lambda x: x[0]==x[1], itertools.izip(a, b)):
        if k != r:
            yield k
            r = k

FIRST = False
print 'Finding %s duplicates, single dupe places "n" elements in to 1m element array'%('FIRST' if FIRST else 'ALL')
for location in (50,5000,50000,500000):
    c = range(0,1000000)
    c[0] = location
    print
    for test in (getDupes_2, getDupes_3, getDupes_4, getDupes_5,
                 getDupes_6, getDupes_7, getDupes_8, getDupes_9, getDupes_a, getDupes_b):
        print 'Test %-15s:%10d - '%(test.__doc__ or test.__name__,location),
        times = [time.time()]
        for i in xrange(0, 5):
            if FIRST:
                print '.' if location == test(c).next() else '!',
            else:
                print '.' if [location] == list(test(c)) else '!',
            times.append(time.time())
        deltas = [t2-t1 for t1,t2 in zip(times[:-1],times[1:])]
        print ' -- %0.3f'%(sum(deltas)/len(deltas))

The results for the 'all dupes' test were consistent:

Test set len change :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 2.524
Test in dict        :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 1.793
Test in set         :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 1.808
Test sort/adjacent  :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 1.253
Test sort/groupby   :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 3.348
Test sort/zip       :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 2.381
Test sort/izip      :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 1.319
Test sort/tee/izip  :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 1.247
Test moooeeeep      :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 1.282
Test iter*/sorted   :    500000 -  . . . . .  -- 0.874  *
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@moooeeeep - be interested to see your views on the ifilter/izip/tee approach. –  F1Rumors Jul 17 at 16:22
1  
this answer is incredibly good.I don't understand that it didn't had more points for the explanations and tests which are very usefull for those that would need it. –  dlewin Aug 17 at 7:48

A bit late, but maybe helpful for some. For a largish list, I found this worked for me.

l=[1,2,3,5,4,1,3,1]
s=set(l)
d=[]
for x in l:
    if x in s:
        s.remove(x)
    else:
        d.append(x)
d
[1,3,1]

Shows just and all duplicates and preserves order.

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Doesn't work with a list of lists. –  vanguard69 Jul 7 at 11:04
list2 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3]
lset = set()
[(lset.add(item), list2.append(item))
 for item in list2 if item not in lset]
print list(lset)
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One line solution:

set([i for i in list if sum([1 for a in list if a == i]) > 1])
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Returns a dictionary though –  ytpillai Jul 11 at 17:12

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