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How can I find the duplicates in a Python list and create another list of the duplicates? The list is just integers.

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possible duplicate of Remove duplicates from a list –  agf Mar 23 '12 at 8:02
6  
@agf That question is about Java, not Python. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 23 '12 at 8:04
3  
@LevLevitsky Ok, so find one of the 100s of identical Python questions. –  agf Mar 23 '12 at 8:16
    
1  
do you want the duplicates once, or every time it is seen again? –  moooeeeep Mar 23 '12 at 9:21
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4 Answers

up vote 65 down vote accepted

To remove duplicates use set(a), to print duplicates - something like

a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]

import collections
print [x for x, y in collections.Counter(a).items() if y > 1]

## [1, 2, 5]
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8  
Great answer but NB: needs 2.7 to work –  Jura Aug 22 '12 at 19:03
    
I find this code does not work with a list of lists. The solution suggested by @ritesh does work with a list of lists. I am using python version 2.7.6. –  kalu Mar 4 at 18:55
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>>> l = [1,2,3,4,4,5,5,6,1]
>>> set([x for x in l if l.count(x) > 1])
set([1, 4, 5])
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+1, very simple and works in 2.6 –  JohnJ Jun 20 '13 at 20:08
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You don't need the count, just whether or not the item was seen before. Adapted that answer to this problem:

def list_duplicates(seq):
  seen = set()
  seen_add = seen.add
  # adds all elements it doesn't know yet to seen and all other to seen_twice
  seen_twice = set( x for x in seq if x in seen or seen_add(x) )
  # turn the set into a list (as requested)
  return list( seen_twice )

a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]
list_duplicates(a) # yields [1, 2, 5]

Just in case speed matters, here are some timings:

# file: test.py
import collections

def thg435(l):
    return [x for x, y in collections.Counter(l).items() if y > 1]

def moooeeeep(l):
    seen = set()
    seen_add = seen.add
    # adds all elements it doesn't know yet to seen and all other to seen_twice
    seen_twice = set( x for x in l if x in seen or seen_add(x) )
    # turn the set into a list (as requested)
    return list( seen_twice )

def RiteshKumar(l):
    return list(set([x for x in l if l.count(x) > 1]))

l = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]*100

And indeed, mine appears to be fastest:

$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test' 'test.moooeeeep(test.l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 134 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test' 'test.thg435(test.l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 415 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test' 'test.RiteshKumar(test.l)'
10 loops, best of 3: 19.2 msec per loop
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Just curious - what's the purpose of seen_add = seen.add here? –  Jura Aug 22 '12 at 19:19
1  
@Rob This way you just call the function you've looked up once before. Otherwise you would need to look up (a dictionary query) the member function add every time an insert would be necessary. –  moooeeeep Aug 29 '12 at 20:09
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collections.Counter is new in python 2.7:


Python 2.5.4 (r254:67916, May 31 2010, 15:03:39) 
[GCC 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46)] on linux2
a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]
import collections
print [x for x, y in collections.Counter(a).items() if y > 1]
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
  File "", line 1, in 
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Counter'
>>> 

In an earlier version you can use a conventional dict instead:

a = [1,2,3,2,1,5,6,5,5,5]
d = {}
for elem in a:
    if elem in d:
        d[elem] += 1
    else:
        d[elem] = 1

print [x for x, y in d.items() if y > 1]
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2  
This is not an answer –  gnibbler Mar 23 '12 at 9:00
    
Given the vague question, I don't think it's a bad answer. –  jdborg Oct 29 '12 at 11:05
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