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I would like to disallow double forward slashes (//) in my regular expression (and thus allow single /), but my solutions doesn't work.

There also has to be NO / at the beginning and ending of a string (this work!):

/^[^/][a-z0-9-/]+[^/]$$/

this allows for example example///example// but NOT/dzkoadokzd///zdkoazaz

Now I want to disallow multiple "/" after each other. I've tried this but it doesn't work (I'm new to regular expressions):

/^[^/]([a-z0-9-]+[/]{1})+[^/]$$/
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It is called a forward slash or just slash. Backslash is \ –  kirilloid Mar 23 '12 at 9:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

/ is a meta character in regex. You need to escape it with a backslash (\/)

/^[^\/]([a-z0-9-]+[\/]{1})+[^\/]$/
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Thanks it's good to know! But this regular expression doesn't work (so does mine): it's invalidate text(a-z). Did you know where the error is? Thanks –  benske Mar 23 '12 at 9:06
2  
This regex doesn't work, because it expects a single character after last "/". To fix it, add a "+" before the "$". –  Rafael Mar 23 '12 at 9:13
    
Oke thanks Rafael, is does work now! –  benske Mar 23 '12 at 9:16
    
There is another potential problem with this regex. I expained everything in my answer. –  Rafael Mar 23 '12 at 9:22

Not sure if this is a requirement, but the regex from jperovic, by using [^/] will accept any character, which is not a slash / (so it will also pass strings like "@abcd/efgh/ijkl/#" (notice the @ and #), but in other parts of the regex we try to limit the characters to [a-z0-9-]. If we want to restrict the character range for the complete string, check the regex below.

/^[a-z0-9\-](?:[a-z0-9\-]|\/(?!\/))+[a-z0-9\-]$/
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Perfect, it was indeed a problem! Thanks! –  benske Mar 23 '12 at 9:31

BTW, if you just want to test for slash at the start or end or double elsewhere:

function badSlash(s) {

  var re = /^\/|\/\/|\/$/;

  return re.test(s);
}

You can add another OR for whatever other patterns you don't want, e.g.

  var re = /^\/|\/\/|\/$|[^a-z0-9\/]/;
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