Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my first question on stack overflow, so far I found all the answers to my problems in no time. Thanks a lot! Usually I am mostly into PLC programming, my knowledge of the PC world is rather limited and this is my first time ever using C#.

So, I happened to try to cross correlate two pixel areas in two bitmaps, according to the paper here: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup/publications/Rankov,%20V.,%20Proceedings%20of%20Spie,%20Vol.%205701,2005.pdf

[EDIT] The goal is to find the exact location of the match in order to perform stitching of the two images. I also took out some of the commented code to make the overview better (I will open another question for the moving average part). [/EDIT]

My problems are the proper implementation of a moving average and general performance tweaks, where I hope you guys can help me out.

The bitmaps have a fixed overlap in all directions which I know (10%), so I can keep the search areas (called composite area in source code below) rather small, but not small enough as it seems. I also assume that they have the same size and pixel format. The performance of my algorithm does not satisfy me, though. I have a feeling (mostly because I lack "deep" knowledge and experience), that there is lots of room for improvement.

I figured out the main performance "eaters" as the following (see source code below):

  • Calculation of pixel values in separate method (mostly introduced for readability, quickly discarded)
  • four nested for loops

Here are some time measurements of release (Core Duo 2.4GHz, 4GB) for two 950px * 950px, 24RGB bitmaps. Search Area (composite image area) was 70px * 800px, sample area 8px * 400px.

  • separate average function: 5519ms
  • average function inlined: 5350ms (only?)
  • [EDIT] changes suggested by Yaur: 700ms![/EDIT]

In general, using smaller sample and search areas (4x40 and 30x100) gives pretty fast times, ranging from a few ms to a few hundret ms. Unfortunately, in order to be safe to find matches I have to use big areas. Before going into subsampling etc., I would like to be sure that my current algorithm is not completely out of the world.

Are there any tweaks / tricks or general improvements you can think of? Every hint would be gladly appreciated.

[EDIT] The correlation method (improved drastically):

private unsafe void CrossCorrelate(ref float CCCoefficient, ref Point SampleMatchLocation)
{
    float res = 0;
    float tmpRes = 0;

    // get bit data of sample area
    BitmapData bmdSample = m_bmpSampleRaw.LockBits(m_rectSampleArea, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, m_bmpSampleRaw.PixelFormat);
    byte* pSample = (byte*)(void*)bmdSample.Scan0;

    // calculate sample average and coefficient 1 (stays same for all iterations)
    int SampleAvg = GetAverage(bmdSample, 0, bmdSample.Width, 0, bmdSample.Height);
    float CN1     = GetCN1(bmdSample, SampleAvg);

    int CompAvg         = 0;
    BitmapData bmdComp  = null;
    Rectangle compRect;

    int SearchHeightLimit   = m_rectSearchArea.Height - m_rectSampleArea.Height;
    int SearchWidthLimit    = m_rectSearchArea.Width - m_rectSampleArea.Width;
    int SearchLocX          = m_rectSearchArea.X;
    int SearchLocY          = m_rectSearchArea.Y;
    int SampleHeight        = m_rectSampleArea.Height;
    int SampleWidth         = m_rectSampleArea.Width;

    int a = 0; // used to calculate power of 2 without using Math.Pow

    // iterate through search area, 
    // in case of equal sizes make sure it iterates at least once
    if (SearchHeightLimit == 0) SearchHeightLimit++;
    if (SearchWidthLimit == 0) SearchWidthLimit++;

    for (int i = 0; i < SearchHeightLimit; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < SearchWidthLimit; j++)
        {
            int CN0Sum = 0;
            int CN2Sum = 0;

            // create composite pixel data at current search location
            compRect    = new Rectangle(SearchLocX + j, SearchLocY + i, SampleWidth, SampleHeight);
            bmdComp     = m_bmpCompositeRaw.LockBits(compRect, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, m_bmpCompositeRaw.PixelFormat);
            byte* pComp = (byte*)(void*)bmdComp.Scan0;

            // get average pixel value of sample area
            CompAvg     = GetAverage(bmdComp, 0, bmdComp.Width, 0, bmdComp.Height); 

            for (int y = 0; y < SampleHeight; y++)
            {
                for (int x = 0; x < SampleWidth; x++)
                {
                    int Sidx = (y * bmdSample.Stride) + x * m_iPixelSize;

                    CN0Sum += (pSample[Sidx] + pSample[Sidx + 1] + pSample[Sidx + 2] - SampleAvg) * (pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg);
                    a =  pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg;
                    CN2Sum += (a * a);
                }
            }

            // release pixeldata of current search area (commented out when using moving average)
            m_bmpCompositeRaw.UnlockBits(bmdComp);

            float CN2 = (float)Math.Sqrt(CN2Sum);
            float CN0 = (float)CN0Sum;
            tmpRes = CN0 / (CN1 * CN2);

            if (tmpRes > res) { res = tmpRes; SampleMatchLocation.X = m_rectSearchArea.X + j; SampleMatchLocation.Y = m_rectSearchArea.Y + i; }

            // exit early if perfect match found
            if (res == 1)
            {
                m_bmpSampleRaw.UnlockBits(bmdSample);
                CCCoefficient = res;
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    m_bmpSampleRaw.UnlockBits(bmdSample);
    CCCoefficient = res;
}

[/EDIT] The correlation method (original):

float res = 0;
float tmpRes = 0;

// get bit data of sample area
BitmapData bmdSample = m_bmpSampleRaw.LockBits(m_rectSampleArea, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, m_bmpSampleRaw.PixelFormat);

// calculate sample average and coefficient 1 (stays same for all iterations)
int SampleAvg  = GetAverage(bmdSample, 0, bmdSample.Width, 0, bmdSample.Height);
float CN1      = GetCN1(bmdSample, SampleAvg);

int CompAvg = 0;
BitmapData bmdComp = null;
Rectangle compRect;

unsafe
{
// iterate through search area (I know it skips if areas have same size)
for (int i = 0; i < (m_rectSearchArea.Height - m_rectSampleArea.Height); i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < (m_rectSearchArea.Width - m_rectSampleArea.Width); j++)
    {
        int CN0Sum = 0;
        int CN2Sum = 0;

        // create composite pixel data at current search location
        compRect    = new Rectangle(m_rectSearchArea.X + j, m_rectSearchArea.Y + i,   m_rectSampleArea.Width, m_rectSampleArea.Height);
        bmdComp     = m_bmpCompositeRaw.LockBits(compRect, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, m_bmpCompositeRaw.PixelFormat);

        CompAvg     = GetAverage(bmdComp, 0, bmdComp.Width, 0, bmdComp.Height);

        // the actual correlation loops
        byte* pSample = (byte*)(void*)bmdSample.Scan0;
        byte* pComp   = (byte*)(void*)bmdComp.Scan0;
        for (int y = 0; y < bmdSample.Height; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < bmdSample.Width; x++)
            {
                int Sidx = (y * bmdSample.Stride) + x * m_iPixelSize; // same stride assumed
                //CN0Sum += (GetPixelValue(pSample, Sidx) - SampleAvg) * (GetPixelValue(pComp, Sidx) - CompAvg);
                CN0Sum += (pSample[Sidx] + pSample[Sidx + 1] + pSample[Sidx + 2] - SampleAvg) * (pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg);
                //CN2Sum += (long)Math.Pow((GetPixelValue(pComp, Sidx) - CompAvg), 2);
                CN2Sum += (int)Math.Pow((pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg), 2);
            }
        }

        // release pixeldata of current search area
        m_bmpCompositeRaw.UnlockBits(bmdComp);
        tmpRes = (float)CN0Sum / (CN1 * (float)Math.Sqrt(CN2Sum));

        if (tmpRes > res) { res = tmpRes; SampleMatchLocation.X = m_rectSearchArea.X + j; SampleMatchLocation.Y = m_rectSearchArea.Y + i; }

        // exit early if perfect match found
        if (res == 1)
        {
            m_bmpSampleRaw.UnlockBits(bmdSample);
            CCCoefficient = res;
            return;
        }
    }
}
} // unsafe
m_bmpSampleRaw.UnlockBits(bmdSample);
CCCoefficient = res;

The method used to calculate the average of a specified area:

private int GetAverage(BitmapData bmpData, int X1, int X2, int Y1, int Y2)
{
    int total = 0;
    if (X2 == 0 || X2 == X1) X2++;
    if (Y2 == 0 || Y2 == Y1) Y2++;
    unsafe
    {
        byte* p = (byte*)(void*)bmpData.Scan0;
        for (int y = Y1; y < Y2; y++)
        {
            for (int x = X1; x <X2; x++)
            {
                int idx = (y * bmpData.Stride) + x * m_iPixelSize;
                //total += GetPixelValue(p, idx);
                total += p[idx] + p[idx + 1] + p[idx + 2];
            }
        }
    }
    return total / ((X2 - X1) * (Y2 - Y1));
}

Small function to calculate pixel averages, discarded this one quickly:

private unsafe Int32 GetPixelValue(byte* pPixel, int idx)
{
    // add up all color values and return
    return pPixel[idx] + pPixel[idx + 1] + pPixel[idx + 2];
}

The function used to calculate the never changing part of the equation

private float GetCN1(BitmapData bmpData, long avg)
{
    double Sum = 0;
    unsafe
    {
        byte* p = (byte*)(void*)bmpData.Scan0;
        for (int y = 0; y < bmpData.Height; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < bmpData.Width; x++)
            {
                int idx = (y * bmpData.Stride) + x * m_iPixelSize;
                Sum += Math.Pow(p[idx] + p[idx + 1] + p[idx + 2] - avg, 2);
            }
        }
    }
    return (float)Math.Sqrt(Sum);
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tested that using unsafe in that area actually gives you a performance increase? In some cases it does, but in many cases it doesn't, simply because the JIT doesn't/can't optimize unsafe areas as aggressively. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 23 '12 at 15:36
    
It won't compile without the unsafe keyword (Allow unsafe flag is set in compiler settings). Is there something I am missing? –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 8:29
    
There are no pointers when using normal (safe) code. Change p to byte[] p = bmpData.Scan0;. Then profile to see which is faster. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 24 '12 at 10:23
    
how to convert IntPtr to byte[]? –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 10:35
    
Oh, it's an IntPtr. You're probably better off using unsafe code then, sorry - this page gives an example of how to copy the data into safe memory, but that will almost certainly be slower than what you're doing now. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 24 '12 at 10:41

4 Answers 4

About performance and "four nested for loops":

Computational complexity of correlation, computed "by definition", is product of all image and pattern dimensions O(W*H*PW*PH). But there is fast method using FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) with complexity O(N^2*Log(N)), where N is the biggest dimension.

Steps:

Zero padding (to equalize sizes)

FFT of image and pattern;

Complex per-component multiplication of image FT with complex-conjugated pattern FT;

Backward FFT of complex product;

Normalization

Addition: Frequently it is useful to shift down all values in the matrix - find mean and subtract it from all the value to get "bipolar" signal. Otherwise maximum value of corr. matrix could be at the peak values of initial matrix rather than at searched fragment position

share|improve this answer
    
this sounds promising, I will try it as soon as I have translated it in terms that my poor brain understands ;) thanks! –  Krombir Mar 23 '12 at 13:32
    
my math is really not good, but as far as I read into the subject now, this will give me a result like "pattern found in image" but will not tell me the exact location. am I wrong? –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 8:43
    
Maximum of correlation represents a vector of the maximum likehood of pattern and region of image (shift of the best position relative to image origin). Of course, it is ideal case, there are a lot of subtleties... –  MBo Mar 24 '12 at 12:08
    
I see. Thanks for the info, I will give it a try! –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 13:23
    
rather illustrative example: originlab.com/index.aspx?go=Products/Origin/Statistics/… –  MBo Mar 24 '12 at 14:29

You want to avoid doing redundant math and making redundant function calls, so this:

for (int i = 0; i < (m_rectSearchArea.Height - m_rectSampleArea.Height); i++)

should be more like:

int height = m_rectSearchArea.Height - m_rectSampleArea.Height;
for (int i = 0; i < height; i++)

edit

you might also try replacing:

int Sidx = (y * bmdSample.Stride) + x * m_iPixelSize; // same stride assumed
//CN0Sum += (GetPixelValue(pSample, Sidx) - SampleAvg) * (GetPixelValue(pComp, Sidx) - CompAvg);
CN0Sum += (pSample[Sidx] + pSample[Sidx + 1] + pSample[Sidx + 2] - SampleAvg) * (pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg);
//CN2Sum += (long)Math.Pow((GetPixelValue(pComp, Sidx) - CompAvg), 2);
CN2Sum += (int)Math.Pow((pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg), 2);

with:

var a = pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg; // this may already be happening
CN0Sum += (pSample[Sidx] + pSample[Sidx + 1] + pSample[Sidx + 2] - SampleAvg) * a;
CN2Sum += (int)(a * a); // replacing a function call with a multiply will get you a little speed

One thing to keep in mind is that the JITer is not that great for this kind of code and you can probably get a bigger bump by moving part of your project to C and P/Invoking from your C# app.

share|improve this answer
    
130ms improvement for setting the loop variables outside the loop. I also took the pointer assignment for the sample area out, since I don't change it. What do you mean with redundant math? –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 9:19
    
I specifically meant in the loops (int i=0;i<a-b;i++) means that a-b needs to be evaluated on each pass... but see updated answer. –  Yaur Mar 24 '12 at 9:49
    
The multiplication thing is great! 700ms nowcompared to 5400ms! –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 10:05

Like many image-related algorithms, this looks like it could be easily parallelized.

If that's true, running this on the GPU should give you an enormous increase in speed... if you're willing to go that far.


You cannot run .Net code directly on a GPU, but there are libraries that will translate your code into something GPU-runnable. Otherwise, you'll need to learn a shader language

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link! I might need this for the rest of the project. –  Krombir Mar 24 '12 at 8:44

In this area:

for (int y = 0; y < bmdSample.Height; y++)
{
   for (int x = 0; x < bmdSample.Width; x++)
   {
     int Sidx = (y * bmdSample.Stride) + x * m_iPixelSize; // same stride assumed
     CN0Sum += (pSample[Sidx] + pSample[Sidx + 1] + pSample[Sidx + 2] - SampleAvg) * (pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg);
     CN2Sum += (int)Math.Pow((pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg), 2);
   }
}

You are using two loops when 1 would do just fine -- since Sidx ranges from 0 to (bmdSample.Height * bmdSample.Stride) + bmdSample.Width * m_iPixelSize you can just have one loop. With no calculation for Sidx. This should be the same functionality:

for (int Sidx = 0; Sidx < (bmdSample.Height * bmdSample.Stride) + bmdSample.Width * m_iPixelSize; Sidx++)
{
   CN0Sum += (pSample[Sidx] + pSample[Sidx + 1] + pSample[Sidx + 2] - SampleAvg) * (pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg);
   CN2Sum += (int)Math.Pow((pComp[Sidx] + pComp[Sidx + 1] + pComp[Sidx + 2] - CompAvg), 2);
}

You can do a similar "trick" with GetAverage and GetCN1

share|improve this answer
    
looking into this right now, on a first try it seemed to compute infinitly (at least i stopped the debug session after two minutes). the representation of the pixels in memory must be flat I guess, so the increments have to be adjusted... I am trying to figure it out now. Thanks so far! –  Krombir Mar 23 '12 at 13:30
    
i think like this I am always iterating through all horizontal pixels, since the stride gives me all bytes of a scanline. I need an increment of three but I need to change lines after Width*3 iterations. Is this possible? My brain just broke –  Krombir Mar 23 '12 at 13:47
    
made it work with .. (Sidx = 0; Sidx < (bmdSample.Height * bmdSample.Stride); Sidx += m_iPixelSize) and if ((Sidx % bmdSample.Stride) > (bmdSample.Width * m_iPixelSize)) Sidx += bmdSample.Stride - (bmdSample.Width * m_iPixelSize) as last line of for loop. takes almost double the time for computing. why is the stride not sized to the actual bitmap area I locked? –  Krombir Mar 23 '12 at 14:02
    
Sorry, just looked at this -- I see I made an error with the original example, but it should not be slower... let me look again. –  Hogan Mar 23 '12 at 19:34
    
Looks like I was wrong about this working -- as you say expected is the representation of bits is flat and contiguous -- It seems it is not. A shame. The strange thing was about 15-20 years ago I had to use ASM to optimize some windows bit map code and I remember it being different, but that was a while ago I guess it has changed. –  Hogan Mar 23 '12 at 20:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.