Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been looking into this issue for 2 days, but no luck.

I have the following struct predefined

struct Motor : Port {
Motor(port_t port) : Port(port) {}
void moveAtVelocity(int velocity) { move_at_velocity(m_port, velocity); }
....
};

I've then tried to call an instance of the struct

Motor M;

And I'm getting

Error: No matching function for call to Motor::Motor()
Note: Candidates are Motor::Motor(port_t)

How do I call an instance so for example I can use the following method

moveAtVelocity(..);

I know I messed up between classes and structures and constructors and destructors; The thing is that I can't find a proper tutorial, extra kudos if you can link one for me.

Thanks in advance :-)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That’s right; what you should have instead is:

Motor M(123);

(where 123 is a port).

When you just say Motor M;, the compiler attempts to construct this object by calling a parameterless constructor. You don’t have any defined. You can, however, just pass the required parameter like I’ve shown above.

An alternative solution is, of course, to just add a parameterless constructor, but this requires your base class, Port, to have one too, or for you to pass a fixed value:

Motor() : Port(123) {}  // fixed value
Motor() {} // assumes Port has a parameterless constructor
share|improve this answer

Motor has a constructor that takes one argument, port_t, so no default constructor is generated (one with no arguments). Try:

Motor M(14); // where 14 is a guess by me at what a `port_t` is.

If there is sensible default value for port_t you could either add a default constructor to Motor:

struct Motor : Port {
    Motor() : Port(14) {}
    Motor(port_t port) : Port(port) {}
    void moveAtVelocity(int velocity) { move_at_velocity(m_port, velocity); }
    ....
};

or specify a default value for parameter in the current constructor:

struct Motor : Port {
    Motor(port_t port = 14) : Port(port) {}
    void moveAtVelocity(int velocity) { move_at_velocity(m_port, velocity); }
    ....
};
share|improve this answer

I'm surprised that there could be a tutorial that didn't mention this. There aren't really any struct's in C++. The keyword struct defines a class type, exactly like the keyword class. The only differences are 1) when you use the keyword struct, you start out public; and when you use the keyword class, you start out private; and 2) inheritance is by default public with struct, and private with class. So:

struct Motor : Port
{
    Motor( port_t port ) : Port( port ) {}
    //  ...
};

is exactly the same as:

class Motor : public Port
{
public:
    Motor( port_t port ) : Port( port ) {}
    //  ...
};

And since you've provided a constructor, the compiler doesn't generate a default constructor.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.