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I have this example:

public class Inheritance {

    public static class Animal {        
        public void Scream() {
            System.out.println("I'm an animal");
        }       
    }

    public  static class Mammal extends Animal{
        public void Scream(){
            System.out.println("I'm a mammal");
        }       
    }

    public  static class Tiger extends Mammal{
        public void Scream(){
            System.out.println("I'm a tiger");
        }       
    }

    public static void main (String[] args){

        Animal tiger = new Tiger();
        tiger.Scream();
    }

}

Of course, I will receive: "I'm a tiger". But, I don't know how to print "I'm a mammal" or "I'm an animal"

@: and please answer for me sub-question: in case Tiger class, What is superclass of Tiger. Mammal or Animal ?

Please help me :)

Thanks ::)

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3  
That would be Mammal. As for the first question, see @Marcus answer. –  Madara Uchiha Mar 23 '12 at 10:38
1  
@Truth can you give me a link about your answer for my second question please.(to make it clearer) because below answers, there is an idea that both Mammal and Animal is superclass of Tiger Thanks :) –  hqt Mar 23 '12 at 10:54
2  
The direct super of the Tiger class, would be Mammal, and the super of Mammal would be Animal, which makes Animal a grandsuper (or an ancestor) of the Tiger class. Which would mean that super.super.Scream() in the Tiger class would print "I'm an animal". –  Madara Uchiha Mar 23 '12 at 10:56
1  
Oh. thanks for your graceful help :) –  hqt Mar 23 '12 at 11:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In method overriding, java will always check whose object has been created at run time. If you wanna a print "I'm a mammal":

Animal m = new Mammal();
m.Scream();

this will print "I'm a mammal".

And if you wanna a print "I'm a animal":

Animal a = new Animal();
a.Scream();
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2  
No. You can't do like that. Because Mammal is sub-class of Animal –  hqt Mar 23 '12 at 10:49
    
thanks to notify my mistake. Please check updated code..... –  kandarp Mar 23 '12 at 10:51

Here is code sample :

public class Inheritance {

  public static class Animal {        
      public void Scream() {
          System.out.println("I'm an animal");
      }       
  }

  public  static class Mammal extends Animal{
      public void Scream(){
          super.Scream();
          System.out.println("I'm a mammal");
      }       
  }

  public  static class Tiger extends Mammal{
      public void Scream(){
          super.Scream();
          System.out.println("I'm a tiger");
      }       
  }

  public static void main (String[] args){
      Animal tiger = new Tiger();
      tiger.Scream();
  }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Oh. no. it's not my idea. because if you call super in class declare, all-object will do like that. But I just want a specified object. –  hqt Mar 23 '12 at 10:48
    
Ah ok, then you should re-phrase your question a bit! –  Marcus Mar 23 '12 at 10:50
    
Oh, sorry if my question doesn't clear. because I use subclass-object mean "object that its class is a subclass of others" –  hqt Mar 23 '12 at 10:52

Java is not like c++ where this could be possible.

You can call super.scream() in each scream method but it will display both :

"I'm a mammal" and "I'm an animal".

I am not sure why you would want to do that.

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To print "I'm a mammal" you should make an object of Mammal class.

 public static void main (String[] args){ 

    Animal mammal = new Mammal(); 
    mammal.Scream(); 
} 

To print "I'm an animal" you should make an object of Animal class.

 public static void main (String[] args){ 

    Animal animal = new Animal(); 
    animal.Scream(); 
} 

NOTE: In both of the above cases reference variable remains Animal.

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1  
Oh. But like the way you declare, so a mammal will say "I'm a mammal". Mean it's no magic. But I want o tiger still say: "I'm a mammal". And of course, just tiger I like. Thanks :) –  hqt Mar 23 '12 at 10:51

1) As the other guys already said, call super.Scream() if you want to call the overridden method from the super class. You would have the following output:

I'm an animal
I'm a mammal
I'm a tiger

2) Tiger implements Mammal, so Mammal is the superclass of Tiger, and since Animal is the superclass of Mammal, Tiger also implements Animal. In other words: Tiger's superclasses are Tiger and Animal.

// all of this is valid:
Tiger tiger = new Tiger();
Mammal mammal = tiger;
Animal animal = tiger;

If you call animal.Scream() the virtual machine knows that anmial is of type Tiger and calls the scream method declared in the Tiger class. See Polymorphism.

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