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I have a TextBox in my application, that it is used for showing state of process. Something like this

for(...)
  textbox.text = "new line \r\n" + textbox.text

Problem is, when it is filling, so no text is visible, just white background. When process is done, then the all added text is visible. Is any option, how do solve this (I need to have text visible during whole process).

Thanks much.

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1  
Which UI Framework are you using? Windows Forms, WPF, ASP.Net? –  Botz3000 Mar 23 '12 at 10:54
1  
This is because you're blocking the main thread inside of your for loop (which is responsible for drawing and updating your form). You'll need to spin off a seperate worker thread to process your data and send messages to your main form to update the text box so that your main thread remains free to refresh. –  George Johnston Mar 23 '12 at 10:55
    
Problem is resolved. I know about BackgroundWorker, but was looking for some simpler solution like Application.DoEvents(). Thanks all for fast answers. –  user1288050 Mar 23 '12 at 11:48
    
You know that you're basically blocking GUI thread so even thou the GUI is updated you're not going to be able to do anything on the GUI itself and any task that will take longer then adding text will freeze the GUI which user may think the app is dead. –  MadBoy Mar 23 '12 at 12:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If it's winforms, add Application.DoEvents(); in the loop, so that your application can refresh the UI.

This is the easiest, but not optimum, way to do it.

EDIT: Someone has downvoted this question without explaining way. That would be fair. The question poster knew about backroundworker and wanted a simpler solution.

Anyway, this solution can be perfect depending on the nature of the loop. If it's a loop with lots of iterations with each taking a short time to execute, making a call to Application.DoEvents() will work perfectly. I know it from my own experience. As it's a loop, it's quite possible that this is the case. Or perhaps it's possible to add several DoEvents() inside the loop. It simply checks the windows message queue and attends pending work.

I don't see any requisite that the user have to keep working on other parts of the application.

If it's a loop with few iterations, and which takes a very long time to execute each, them, it's neccessary to do it using threading.

But, rememeber that a novice can make mistakes if he uses threads without knowing very well its implications (I refer to thread-safety). What if the app gets a deadlock? What about corrupting non thread-safe structures used from different threads? What if the user closes the main Window while the background thread hasn't still finished? Let's be serious, this tool can be a bomb in unexperienced hands.

Besides, if you want to use threading BackgroundWorker is not the only solution.

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public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        BackgroundWorker bg = new BackgroundWorker();
        bg.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(bg_DoWork);
        bg.RunWorkerAsync();
    }


    delegate void Temp();
    void bg_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        Temp temp = new Temp(UpdateTextBox);

        while (true)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            textBox1.BeginInvoke(temp);

        }
    }

    void UpdateTextBox()
    {
        textBox1.Text += "+";
    }
}
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Thats because the UI is refreshed only after the method completes and the message pump is clear to check for "refresh" messages.

You could use Application.DoEvents() at the end of the loop.

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Use multithreading to update your text box. In your code updates happens too fast so you see just white background.

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Your loop is blocking the main UI thread. Therefore once control leaves the loop, UI is updated at once. I think you should use BackgroundWorker here. Your problem is well discussed in this article. Hopefully it will help.

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You need to use BackgroundWorker to update your gui from other thread and leave the GUI working for itself (as in you can do other stuff inside GUI like clicking checkboxes or viewing other things). Then you use LogBoxTextAdd method to update the TextBox from another thread so it doesn't cause Cross-Thread Error.

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication4 {
    public partial class Form1 : Form {
        private readonly BackgroundWorker bg = new BackgroundWorker();
        public Form1() {
            InitializeComponent();
            bg.DoWork += doWork;
        }
        private void doWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
            for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++) {
                LogBoxTextAdd("TEST");
            }
        }
        private void LogBoxTextAdd(string varText) {
            if (InvokeRequired) {
                textBox1.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => LogBoxTextAdd(varText)));
            } else {
                textBox1.Text = varText + "\r\n" + textBox1.Text;
            }
        }
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
            bg.RunWorkerAsync();
        }
    }
}
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