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In many of our projects I have seen a few custom collection / or container classes that hold a some sort of generic collection, e.g. a List(of T) class.

They usually have a GetXXX method that returns a IEnumerable of whatever type the custom collection class uses so the internal collection can be iterated around using a foreach loop.

e.g.

public IEnumerable<UploadState> GetStates
{
    get
    {
        return new List<UploadState>(m_states);
    }
}

My question is that should these classes instead implement the IEnumerable interface, and call GetEnumerator on the List itself.

Is there a preferred way, or is it up to the developer?

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1  
What is type of the m_states? Just wondering why it is wrapped by new List<> and returned as IEnumerable<> –  sll Mar 23 '12 at 11:02
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your class is a custom collection class then yes, it should implement IEnumerable<T>. In this case a public property for the inner list would be redundant. Imagine a simple class:

public class People : IEnumerable<Person>
{
    List<Person> persons = new List<Person>();

    public IEnumerator<Person> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return persons.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

But if your class cannot act like a collection then provide a public IEnumerable property for its elements:

public class Flight
{
    List<Person> passengers = new List<Person>();

    public IEnumerable<Person> Passengers
    {
        get { return passengers; }
    }
}

Anyway, it's always up to the developer to choose the right design.

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Thanks Balazs Tihanyi, can I ask a silly question about your example, why do you implemented from IEnumerable<Person> and not IEnumberble? I am not sure. –  bobbo Mar 23 '12 at 13:06
    
Why would you want to? IEnumerable<Person> is generic and type-safe. IEnumerable is for .NET 1.1 or anonymous types. If you only implement the IEnumerable interface, you'd have to cast your list items to their type. –  Balazs Tihanyi Mar 23 '12 at 13:29

I would do it that way:

public IEnumerable<UploadState> GetStates
{
    get
    {
        foreach (var state in m_states) { 
            yield return state; 
        }
    }
}

It is cleaner, your users don't get a list where they shouldn't (they could cast it to a List<T>after all) and you don't need to create a List<T>object.

EDIT: Misunderstood the question. I think if the class is meant to be a collection, it should implement IEnumerable<T>.

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I believe this is was not asked here so it can be a comment not an answer, but anyway makes sense from refactoring standpoint –  sll Mar 23 '12 at 11:06

Consider that in your code example a new list created. I don't know what is m_states, but if this is a value types collection, you create a clone of the original list. In this way the returning list can be manipulated form the caller Add/Remove/Update elements. without affectiing original data.

If m_states are reference types, this still creates a new list which can be again manipulated by the caller Add/Remove/ No update elements (it's a reference!) without affecting original data.

What about IEnumerable<T>, its just a way to make a returning type generic, and not make strong coupling to List<T> type.

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m_states is a reference type. Its declared as private List<UploadState> m_states = new List<UploadState>(); I thought that method return could not be manipulated because of returning an IEnumerable<UploadState>, not a List<UploadState>? –  bobbo Mar 23 '12 at 11:13
    
@bobbo: sure it can, if you pick up an element from returning collection and change it's property, you change the property of original element,as this is a reference type. –  Tigran Mar 23 '12 at 11:16
    
OK, that makes sense. However, your sentence "If m_states are reference types, this still creates a new list which can be again manipulated by the caller Add/Remove/ No update elements (it's a reference!) without affecting original data." is confusing. Do you mean that the new list returned can been added to, and elements can be removed but no updates? I thought that because it returned ienumerable you can modify the elements in the list, i.e. change a property like you said but you can't add and remove items in the list. Is that correct? –  bobbo Mar 23 '12 at 11:32
    
I mean: if you want to execute some statistics on that list, remove elements from it add anew aggergated values (say), it will not affect in any way m_states list. –  Tigran Mar 23 '12 at 11:36
    
Thanks, that makes sense –  bobbo Mar 23 '12 at 11:40

I think if your newly implemented class just behaves the sameway as a list does, there is no need to implement it. If you need some kind of custom logic, it depends on what you want to do; you can inherit list or you can implement IEnumerable. It just depends what is to be achieved.

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You might want to check this: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/4074/Using-IEnumerator-and-IEnumerable-in-the-NET-Frame

I didn't read fully it yet, but I think this answers your question.

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You should be deriving your custom collection classes based on one of the classes in System.Collections.ObjectModel namespace. They already contain implementations of IEnumerable<T> and the non generic IEnumerable interfaces.

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