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I'm trying to compile a program with debugging symbols so that valgrind will give me line numbers. I have found that if I compile a simple test program in one go (with -g) then it contains the symbols. However, if I compile in two passes (i.e. compile then link) then it does not contain the debugging symbols.

Here's the compile command for the single pass case:

g++ -g file.c -o file

And for two passes

g++ -g -c file.c -o file.o
g++ -g file.o -o file

The actual program looks like this and contains a simple Invalid Write

int main(){
    int* x = new int[10];
    x[10]=1;

}

If I compile with one pass then valgrind gives the following (note the line number at the end)

==24114== 40 bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 2 of 9
==24114==    at 0xB823: malloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:266)
==24114==    by 0x5768D: operator new(unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==24114==    by 0x576DA: operator new[](unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==24114==    by 0x100000F09: main (file.c:3)

whereas if I compile in two passes I get this (with no line number):

==24135== 40 bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 2 of 9
==24135==    at 0xB823: malloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:266)
==24135==    by 0x5768D: operator new(unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==24135==    by 0x576DA: operator new[](unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==24135==    by 0x100000F09: main (in ./file)

Any insight on this would be much appreciated. I am using gcc version 4.2.1 on OS X 10.7.3

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1  
Does Clang exhibit the same behaviour? –  rubenvb Mar 23 '12 at 11:19
1  
I guess something must be broken on your toolchain. On ubuntu (gcc 4.6.1) valgrind (3.6.1) shows line numbers for both compilation methods. –  dbrank0 Mar 23 '12 at 11:39
1  
can you debug second method using gdb step by step? –  ks1322 Mar 23 '12 at 11:50
9  
Final remark - it was indeed an OS X specific 'feature' to do with the way OS X links debug information. Valgrind helps the user circumvent the problem with the command --dsymutil=yes. You can read more about it here: tinyurl.com/6lwaez5 Credit to Dave Goodell who sent me the solution on valgrind users forum. –  Peter Cogan Mar 23 '12 at 14:01
10  
Probably best to post that as an answer, rather than a comment. I'd have found it sooner that way. –  ams Mar 23 '12 at 17:25
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just for marking this question as "answered" (so it's not needlessly opened and read by others).

=> Answer is found as the comment from "user1288111" to the initial question.

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Final remark - it was indeed an OS X specific 'feature' to do with the way OS X links debug information. Valgrind helps the user circumvent the problem with the command --dsymutil=yes. You can read more about it here: tinyurl.com/6lwaez5 Credit to Dave Goodell who sent me the solution on valgrind users forum

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