Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After calling msgrcv(), I got a E2BIG: on SunOS, CPP compiler.

Output is as following:

arguments:
MsgID: 335006
pointer: 0xffbfbac8
sizeof: 1040
MsgType: 0
MsgFlag: 2048
RetVal=-1
RM: message waiting failed with error 7.

In manual:

ssize_t msgrcv(int msqid, void *msgp, size_t msgsz, long msgtyp, int msgflg);

Maunal says for msgrcv(), E2BIG is got when "message text length is greater than msgsz and MSG_NOERROR isn't specified in msgflg."

But in my case, it looks liks the length is equal to msg text. By the way, how this function get the length of void *msgp? It is a void.

Sorry, I posted a long piece of codes since I am afraid to miss something. Thanks.

EDIT:
Manual says,

The msgp argument is a pointer to caller-defined structure of the  fol-
       lowing general form:

            struct msgbuf {
                long mtype;       /* message type, must be > 0 */
                char mtext[1];    /* message data */
            };

The  mtext  field is an array (or other structure) whose size is specified by msgsz, a non-negative integer value

I add more information by gdb as following: 227 RetVal = msgrcv( TDM_M[MyModule].msg_id, 228 (void *)&SysMsg, 229 (size_t)sizeof(T_MSGBUF), 230 MsgType, 231 MsgFlag); 23 235 */ (gdb) p sizeof(SysMsg) $10 = 1044 (gdb) p sizeof(T_MSGBUF) $11 = 1040

Length - Destination's size = 4 (= size of long int), looks like it is correct. In addition, I found the problem only happens to SunOS. The same code works fine on Linux.

Edit I found the root cause. Like the errno E2BIG indicating MsgLength is less than the message received, my send macro count a wrong value which was supposed to be equal to the MsgLength in WAIT_MSG().

Thank you for your advice and answers.

.h file /* MSGBUF is defined for specific message * SysMsg is defined as arg for msgrcv */

#define MSGBUF_SIZE     1040
#define MSGBODY_SIZE    (MSGBUF_SIZE)
#define MSGBODY_SIZE1   (MSGBUF_SIZE-16)

typedef struct {

   unsigned char        SrcModule;
   unsigned char        DstModule;
   unsigned char        MsgType;       

   unsigned short       SubMsgId;
   unsigned short       Length;
   long int             reserved;
} MsgHeader;

typedef struct _MsgBody {
   unsigned char Data[MSGBODY_SIZE1];
} MSGBODY;

typedef struct _MsgBuf {
   MsgHeader Header;             // the header of message.
   MSGBODY   Body;                   // the message body.
} MSGBUF;

typedef struct _MsgInside {
    long int        MsgType;
    MSGBUF          MsgText;
} SYS_MSG;

.cpp

int WaitMsg (DMMODULE        MyModule,
                MSGBUF*       pMsgBuf,
                long            MsgType,
                int             MsgFlag,
                TIME_USEC       abs_timeout)
{
   SYS_MSG      SysMsg;
   int          RetVal;

   ...

    memset(&SysMsg, 0, sizeof(SYS_MSG));


        printf("arguments:\n");
        printf("MsgID: %d\n", Module[MyModule].msg_id);
        printf("pointer: 0x%x\n", (void *)&SysMsg);
        printf("sizeof: %d\n",  (size_t)sizeof(T_MSGBUF));

         printf("MsgType: %d\n", MsgType);
        printf("MsgFlag: %d\n", MsgFlag);

    /* Module is a global array in which msg_id is storing */
    RetVal = msgrcv( Module [MyModule].msg_id,
                     (void *)&SysMsg,
                     (size_t)sizeof(MSGBUF),
                     MsgType,
                     MsgFlag);

    /* So far, only ENOMSG is handled, the rest is ignored,
     * Maybe a signal handler is needed later.
     */
    if( RetVal == -1 )
    {
        switch (errno)
        {
        case ENOMSG:
            return My_ENOMSG;

        case E2BIG:
        case EACCES:
        case EAGAIN:
        case EFAULT:
        case EIDRM:
        case EINTR:
        case EINVAL:

/* Here is where the error reported */

            printf("%s: message waiting failed with error %d.\n",
                     Module[MyModule].name, errno);
            printf("%s: \n", strerror(errno));

            return FAIL;

      default:

            printf("%s: message waiting failed with error %d.\n",
                     Module[MyModule].name, errno);
            printf("%s: \n", strerror(errno));

            return FAIL;
        }
    }

    memcpy(pMsgBuf, &(SysMsg.MsgText), sizeof(T_MSGBUF));


    printf("message is received by %s.\n",  Module[MyModule].name);


    return SUCC;

}

...
#define WAIT_MSG(MyModule,pMsgBuf,time_us )             \
        WaitMsg((MyModule),(pMsgBuf),0,IPC_NOWAIT,0)

int main()
{
   int rc = -1;
   MSGBUF    msgbuf; 

   rc = WAIT_MSG( RM, &msgbuf, 0 );
    ...
}

}
share|improve this question
    
This question is tagged Linux but the question mentinos SunOS... which is it? –  FatalError Mar 23 '12 at 12:18
    
Sorry, I change the tag from linux to unix. –  Joe.Z Mar 23 '12 at 12:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The error E2BIG indicates that the message you are trying to receive doesn't fit in your buffer. You have to make the buffer bigger. Your buffer is around 1020 or 1024 bytes, I'm not sure. If the incoming message is bigger, you get E2BIG.

By the way, how this function get the length of void *msgp? It is a void.

It seems like you are a little unclear on how pointers work. Pointers just point to a single location in memory, they don't have lengths. (Even non-void pointers don't have a "length".) Whenever you specify a region of memory, you have to specify both its starting location (void *) and its length (size_t). When you pass a range of memory to a function in C, the length is typically specified in one of three ways:

  1. The length is fixed. For example, when you call setjmp, you pass a pointer to a region of memory which is sizeof(jmp_buf) bytes long.
  2. The length is passed as a separate argument. For example, fwrite or msgrcv.
  3. The length is discovered using a sentinel. For example, strlen.

Advice:

  1. If you need to pass a pointer as void *, don't use a cast; this can hide a bug in your code if you accidentally cast a non-pointer to void *. Pointers are automatically cast to void * when necessary.
  2. The result of sizeof is always size_t, don't cast it. It's like writing (int)1, (double)0.5, or (const char [6])"Hello".
  3. Don't use sizeof(type) for memcpy or msgrcv arguments. Typos in memcpy arguments are a common source of errors, and referring to distant types makes them harder to spot when reading code.

    // Not so good
    // Reading the code, I have to look for the definition of pMsgBuf
    // in order to know if sizeof(T_MSGBUF) is correct
    memcpy(pMsgBuf, &(SysMsg.MsgText), sizeof(T_MSGBUF));
    // Who knows if sizeof(MSGBUF) is correct?
    msgrcv(..., &SysMsg, sizeof(MSGBUF), ...);
    
    // Better
    // Reading the code, I know sizeof(*pMsgBuf) is correct,
    // but &(SysMsg.MsgText) might be a different type.
    memcpy(pMsgBuf, &(SysMsg.MsgText), sizeof(*pMsgBuf));
    msgrcv(..., &SysMsg, sizeof(SysMsg), ...);
    
    // Best
    // Most errors will be caught by the compiler.
    static void msgbuf_copy(MSGBUF *dest, const MSGBUF *src)
    { memcpy(dest, src, sizeof(*dest)); }
    
    msgbuf_copy(pMsgBuf, &SysMsg.MsgText);
    
  4. If you want your messages to be 1024 bytes, write that in the code. Don't assemble a structure that just happens to add up to 1024 bytes, make it happen explicitly.

    typedef struct {
       unsigned char        SrcModule;
       unsigned char        DstModule;
       unsigned char        MsgType;       
    
       unsigned short       SubMsgId;
       unsigned short       Length;
       long int             reserved;
    } MsgHeader;
    
    typedef struct {
       MsgHeader Header;
       char Body[1024 - sizeof(MsgHeader)];
    } MSGBUF;
    
share|improve this answer

The variable SysMsg passed to msgrcv is of type

typedef struct _MsgInside {
    long int        MsgType;
    MSGBUF          MsgText;
} SYS_MSG;

Have you tried something dumb and simple

typedef struct _MsgInside {
    long int        MsgType;
    char          MsgText[10000];
} SYS_MSG;

to see if it changes its behaviour?

Edit, ooops

Also the size field is sizeof(MSGBUF) but the type of the message is SYS_MSG

At best this is confusing; always use sizeof(var).

share|improve this answer
    
Changing the size of a structure to more than 100000 bytes may cause problems since it's used as a local variable. Plenty of C compilers have smaller limits for the total space for local variables. –  Dietrich Epp Mar 23 '12 at 13:37
    
@Dietrich Epp - Fair point - I'll make it 10000. My real point is try to simplify the code, and increase its likelyhood of getting past that error. Changing to sizeof(var) removes one source of error, making the buffer big removes another possible source. In my experience, what I ASSuME is the cause of an error might not be it. So I find 'Simplify & Improve Chances' is a handy tactic to get past those. –  gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 13:46

To compute the correct msgsz, do sizeof(SysMsg) - sizeof(SysMsg.MsgType) : you have to subtract the long mtype field of the message buffer. And this must be done in the sender too.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I did it both for msgsnd and msgrcv, SysMsg is bigger than SysMsg.MsgText by 4 bytes. Please see my EDIT. –  Joe.Z Mar 23 '12 at 15:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.